Author Archive for: ChiRenda

About ChiRenda

ASCC Speakers List: The Church and the World

The Church in America

“The Catholic Experience and the American Experience” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“A Catholic Reading of the American Enterprise” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Church in America” By Fr. C. John McCloskey, Director of the Catholic Information Center, Washington, D.C.

Culture and the Church

“Catholicism and Culture” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“Christian Humanism” by Virgil Nemoianu, William J. Byron Distinguished Professor of Literature and Ordinary Professor of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America and Vice-President of the International Comparative Literature Association

“Christianity and Culture” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Concept of Christian Civilization” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Culture”, by Raymond Arroyo: EWTN, Host of Life on the Rock

“Is the Catholic Church the Enemy of Intellectual Progress?” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“The Kingdom Come on Earth as it is in Heaven: the Place of the Family in Creation” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Maturity of Christian Culture: Some Reflections on the Views of Christopher Dawson” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Power of Hollywood” by L. Brent Bozell, Founder and President of the Media Research Center and the Parents Television Council

General Topics in Religion and Culture:

Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

Deal Hudson, Publisher and Editor of Crisis Magazine

The Contemporary Church

Any Contemporary issue in the Church: Raymond Arroyo: EWTN, Host of Life on the Rock

“The Church in the Modern World” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Current Crisis in the Catholic Church” by Kenneth Whitehead, United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Postsecondary Education (retired)

“CUF: Past, Present, and Future” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“Dissent” by John Mallon, Contributing Editor of Inside the Vatican Magazine

“The Fully Catholic Response to the Scandals Currently Rocking the Catholic Church” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“The Future of Religious Freedom Internationally” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Humanae Vitae and Conscience” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“Of Miters and Men: The Mission of Bishops in the Third Millennium” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“The Priesthood and the Laity in the Domestic Church” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“The Real Cause of the Crisis: And What We Can Do” by Fr. Joseph Fessio, S.J., Editor at Ignatius Press and Chancellor of Ave Maria University

“Religious Freedom Worldwide” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Spirituality in the Modern World” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Strengthening Catholicism in America” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Tertio Millenion Adveniente: The Church in the Twenty-First Century” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“What’s Really Wrong in Today’s Church: A Catholic Layman’s View” by Joseph Hagan, President Emeritus of Assumption College, Professor-At-Large at John Cabot University, and Gentleman-in-Waiting to Pope John Paul II

“The Worldwide Persecution of Christians” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Women and the Church” by independent scholar Catherine Brown Tkacz

Ecumenism/Other Religions

“The Ecumenism of John Paul II” by Kenneth Whitehead, United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Postsecondary Education (retired)

“Evangelicals and Catholics” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“Indestructible Islam” by Jude P. Dougherty, Dean Emeritus of the School of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America

“Understanding Radical Islam” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

Feminism

“Catholic Feminism” Margaret Monahan Hogan, Chair of the Philosophy Department at King’s College, President of the Center for Academic Integrity at Duke University, and Fellow at the Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture

“Fallacies of Catholic Feminism” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“The Feminist Case Against Abortion” by Serrin Foster, president of Feminists for Life

“Motherhood at the Heart of the New Feminism: A Vocation of Love and Service” by Mary Cunningham Agee: The Nurturing Network, President and Founder; Culture of Life Foundation and Institute, Vice Chairman

“Refuse to Choose: Reclaiming Feminism” by Sally A. Winn, Vice President of Feminists for Life

“Women and the Church” by independent scholar Catherine Brown Tkacz

“Women and the Church” by Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Eléonore Raoul Professor of the Humanities and Professor of History

“Women in the Early Church” by independent scholar Catherine Brown Tkacz

“The ‘New Feminism’” by Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Eléonore Raoul Professor of the Humanities and Professor of History

The Media

“Catholic Journalism” by Joseph Bottum: The Weekly Standard, Books and Arts Editor

“The Church and the Media” by Russell Shaw, Author, Editor, Journalist

“Evangelization Through the Media” by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“Media Bias” by L. Brent Bozell, Founder and President of the Media Research Center and the Parents Television Council

“The Media, Particularly its Effects on Us” by Raymond Arroyo: EWTN, Host of Life on the Rock

“The Media’s Impact” by L. Brent Bozell, Founder and President of the Media Research Center and the Parents Television Council

“Understanding the Media” by Connaught Marshner, President of the American Catholic Council

“Vatican II and the Press” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

Secularism

“The Need to Reunderstand What We Mean by the Term ŒSecular‚” “by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

“The Rise of Secularism” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

“The Secular City” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Secularism” by Charles E. Rice, Professor Emeritus of Law at the University of Notre Dame School of Law and Visiting Professor at the Ave Maria University School of Law

General Topics

“Come, Follow Me” (personal testimony) by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“Discrimination Against Traditional Religious Believers in the Academy” by Candace De Russy, Trustee at the State University of New York

“The Future of the Papacy” by Russell Shaw, Author, Editor, Journalist

“Liturgy” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“Salvation: Participating in the Divine Nature” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Where Are You with God? by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

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ASCC Speakers List: Catholic Thought

The Arts and the Church

“The Arts” by Raymond Arroyo, EWTN, Host of Life on the Rock

“The Arts and the Church” by Leonardo Defilippis, Founder of St. Luke Productions

“Film, Comedy, and Christian Humanism: Whit Stillman” ” by Mark C. Henrie, Senior Editor at the Intercollegiate Studies Institute

“Gothic Architecture and Scholasticism” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Key to the Brescia Casket: Typology and the Early Christian Imagination” by independent scholar Catherine Brown Tkacz

“Typology” by independent scholar Catherine Brown Tkacz

Catholic Literature

“Catholic Literature” by Joseph Bottum: The Weekly Standard, Books and Arts Editor

“The Christian Gifts of J.R.R. Tolkien” by Bradley Birzer Assistant Professor of History at Hillsdale College and Senior Fellow at the Center for the American Idea in Houston

“Dante’s Divine Comedy: Classical Catholic Poetry” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Dante’s Political Vision” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Dante’s Use of Thomistic Thought in the Divine Comedy” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Literature and Religion” by Virgil Nemoianu, William J. Byron Distinguished Professor of Literature and Ordinary Professor of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America and Vice-President of the International Comparative Literature Association

“Literature and the Sacramental Imagination” by C.N. “Sue” Abromaitis, Loyola College in Maryland, Professor of English

“Nature and Grace in Dante’s Purgatorio” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Two Percies” by Peter Augustine Lawler, Dana Professor of Government at Berry College

“Writing Novels with a Catholic Perspective” by Bud Macfarlane, Jr., MI, Founder and Executive Director of the Mary Foundation, St. Jude Media, CatholiCity.com, and Founder of the Colebrook Society

Catholic Social Teaching

“Catholic Social Teaching in Business” by Jean Francois Orsini, President of the St. Antoninus Institute for Catholic Education in Business

“Catholic Social Teaching and the Law” by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

“The Development of Papal Social Teaching: From Leo XIII to John Paul II” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Human Rights and Human Responsibilities according to the Church’s social teachings” by, Fr. Robert Araujo S.J.: Gonzaga University School of Law, Professor of Law

“Immigration” by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

“Introduction to Catholic Social Thought” by Mark C. Henrie, Senior Editor at the Intercollegiate Studies Institute

“Papal Social Teaching in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Papal Teaching on the Family, the State, and the Social Question” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“The Philosophical Underpinnings of Catholic Social Teaching: Natural Law and Personalism” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“What Does Catholic Social Doctrine Have to Teach American Liberalism?” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

Service

“Practical Idealism: Compassion in Action” by Mary Cunningham Agee: The Nurturing Network, President and Founder; Culture of Life Foundation and Institute, Vice Chairman

Catholic Universities/Catholic Education

“Academic Freedom and Catholic Identity at Catholic Universities” by David DeWolf, Professor of Law at Gonzaga University School of Law

“The Basic Principles of Jesuit Education” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“A Brief History of How and Why the Jesuits Moved into the Apostolate of Education” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“A Basic Introduction to the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius and their Foundational Role in Jesuit Education” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“Cardinal Newman” by Don Briel, Koch Chair in Catholic Studies at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas, MN.

“Catholic Campus Life” by Mary Beth Bonacci, Real Love Productions

“Campus Culture: Challenges and Hopes” by Fr. William Watson, S.J., Vice President for Mission at Gonzaga University

“Catholic High Schools” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Catholic Identity on a Catholic Campus” by Larry Chapp, Associate Professor of Theology at DeSales University

“The Catholic Law School” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Catholic Studies” by Don Briel, Koch Chair in Catholic Studies at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas, MN.

“Catholic Universities” by Fr. David O‚Connell, CM, JCD, President of the Catholic University of America

“The Catholic University Situation” by Kenneth Whitehead, United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Postsecondary Education (retired)

“Catholicism and the Liberal Model of the University in America” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Christianity and Education Today” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Education, Truth, and the Catholic University” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Ex Corde Ecclesiae” by Fr. David O‚Connell, CM, JCD, President of the Catholic University of America

“Ex Corde Ecclesiae: The Beginning, the Vision, The Reality” by Joseph Hagan, President Emeritus of Assumption College, Professor-At-Large at John Cabot University, and Gentleman-in-Waiting to Pope John Paul II

“Faith and Justice in Catholic Universities” by Fr. William Watson, S.J., Vice President for Mission at Gonzaga University

“The History of Catholic Higher Education in the United States” by Philip Gleason, Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Notre Dame

“The History and Nature of Catholic Education” by Don Briel, Koch Chair in Catholic Studies at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas, MN.

“How to Be a Campus Radical” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Jesuit Education in the United States One Hundred Years Ago” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“Maritain and the Idea of a Catholic University” by Gavin T. Colver, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Assumption College

“The Medieval Catholic University” by Michael Tkacz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University

“My Twenty Years as President of a Catholic College” by Joseph Hagan, President Emeritus of Assumption College, Professor-At-Large at John Cabot University, and Gentleman-in-Waiting to Pope John Paul II

“Newman and Catholic Higher Education” by Don Briel, Koch Chair in Catholic Studies at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas, MN.

“The Origins of Christian Education” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Radical Hope on Campus” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“What Happened to the Catholic University” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

Topics in Catholic Catholic/Catholic Education by Fr. C. John McCloskey, Director of the Catholic Information Center, Washington, D.C.

Education (general)

“The Campus War Against Faith” by Candace De Russy, Trustee at the State University of New York

“The Crisis of Western Education” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Current State of American Higher Education” by Joseph Hagan, President Emeritus of Assumption College, Professor-At-Large at John Cabot University, and Gentleman-in-Waiting to Pope John Paul II

“Deconstructing the University” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Discrimination Against Traditional Religious Believers in the Academy” by Candace De Russy, Trustee at the State University of New York

“Liberal Education” by Phillip Goggans, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Seattle Pacific University

“The Love of Learning and the Desire for God” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Moral Imagination, the Economy of Grace, and the Purpose of Education in the Western Tradition” by Bradley Birzer Assistant Professor of History at Hillsdale College and Senior Fellow at the Center for the American Idea in Houston

“Objective Truth and Subjective Education” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

“Reform and Reformers in Higher Education” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“The University as Community” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The University and Revolution: The 1960s Agenda for American Higher Education” by Rear Admiral (ret.) Michael Ratliff, Vice President of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute

Topics in the Philosophy of Education by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“Why Go to College?” ” by Mark C. Henrie, Senior Editor at the Intercollegiate Studies Institute

History

“American Catholicism before the Second Vatican Council” by Philip Gleason, Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Notre Dame

“American Catholic History in General” by Philip Gleason, Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Notre Dame

“Ancient Christianity and Us: The Once and Future Church” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“A Brief History of How and Why the Jesuits Moved into the Apostolate of Education” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“The Catholic Church and Immigration to the United States” by Philip Gleason, Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Notre Dame

“The Chinese Rites Controversy” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“Christian Philosophy, Christian History: Parallel Ideas” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Christopher Dawson and a Return to Christendom” by Bradley Birzer Assistant Professor of History at Hillsdale College and Senior Fellow at the Center for the American Idea in Houston

“Choruses from the Ideologues, Fields of Martyrs, and Realities of Hope”(how history will save us from the ideologues) by Bradley Birzer Assistant Professor of History at Hillsdale College and Senior Fellow at the Center for the American Idea in Houston

“Church and State in Historical Perspective” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Dechristianization of Europe” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The History of Catholic Higher Education in the United States” by Philip Gleason, Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Notre Dame

“A History of the Marian Sodalities and how they were used to implement Jesuit thought and fuller participation in the sacramental life of the Church” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“The History of Religious Freedom” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“History and the Theology of History” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Important Trends in Pre-Vatican II Piety” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“Jesuit Education in the United States One Hundred Years Ago” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“Law and History of Abortion” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Knocking Down the Myths of Catholic History” by Harry Crocker, author of Triumph: The Power and the Glory of the Catholic Church

“The Medieval Catholic University” by Michael Tkacz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University

“Medieval Irish History” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Men of Vatican II” by Fr. Joseph Fessio, S.J., Editor at Ignatius Press and Chancellor of Ave Maria University

“The Origins of Christian Education” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Origins of the Christian View of History” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Origins of Christian Monasticism” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Sex in the Middle Ages” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

Just War

“Are U.S. Military Plans Consistent with Just War?” by Rear Admiral (ret.) Michael Ratliff, Vice President of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute

“The Catholic Tradition on Just War” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“Christianity, War, and America” by Thomas West, Professor of Politics at the University of Dallas and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Just War: Its Condition, Our Current Situation, and Why it Matters” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“The Just War Tradition” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Peace, War, and the Common Good” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“War and Peace” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

Law and Religion

“Canon Law” by Fr. David O’Connell, CM, JCD, President of the Catholic University of America

“Catholic Social Teaching and the Law” by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

“Catholic Perspectives on American Law” by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

“Church and State in Historical Perspective” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Law and History of Abortion” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Moral Anthropology and American Law” by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

“The Relation Between Christian Anthropology and the Law” by Richard Garnett, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Notre Dame School of Law

“Prayer and the Supreme Court” by Charles E. Rice, Professor Emeritus of Law at the University of Notre Dame School of Law and Visiting Professor at the Ave Maria University School of Law

“Separating Church and State” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Supreme Court and the Establishment Clause” by Richard Garnett, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Notre Dame School of Law

“The Supreme Court and the Establishment Clause” by Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Understanding Church and State” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Vouchers” by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

Topics in Church and State Issues by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

Natural Law

“Aquinas‚ Moral Theory: Law, Grace, and Virtue” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Censorship and Natural Law” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Freedom, Providence, and the Natural Law” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Medical Ethics, Reproductive Technology, and the Natural Law” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Natural Law” by Charles E. Rice, Professor Emeritus of Law at the University of Notre Dame School of Law and Visiting Professor at the Ave Maria University School of Law

“Natural Law” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Natural Law” by J. Budziszewski, Associate Professor of Government and Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin

“Natural Law” by Michael Tkacz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University

“Natural Law” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Natural Law Arguments Against Contraception” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“Natural Law and the Bible” by J. Budziszewski, Associate Professor of Government and Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin

“Natural Law Ethics” by Phillip Goggans, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Seattle Pacific University

“The Natural Law: Its History, Its Content, and Its Applications” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Natural Law, John Courtney Murray, and the Emergence of an Abortion Culture” by Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“The Philosophical Underpinnings of Catholic Social Teaching: Natural Law and Personalism” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

Philosophy and the Church

“21st Century Thomism” by Peter Augustine Lawler, Dana Professor of Government at Berry College

“The Analogy of Being from Aquinas to Calvin” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Catholic Philosophy” by Joseph Bottum: The Weekly Standard, Books and Arts Editor

“Christian Philosophy, Christian History: Parallel Ideas” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Faith and Reason” by Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Eléonore Raoul Professor of the Humanities and Professor of History

“Faith and Reason” by Michael Tkacz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University

“Fideism” by Michael Tkacz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University

“How to Argue for God’s Existence” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“Metaphysics and Theology” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Natural Teleology, Form, and Contemporary Positivist Science” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Nature from Aristotle to Ambrose” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Philosophical background to Pope John Paul II’s Personalist Anthropology & Moral Thought” by Jorge Garcia, Professor of Philosophy at Boston College

“Philosophy of Religion” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“Philosophy of Science” by Michael Tkacz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University

“Reason and Revelation in Aquinas and Calvin” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Relevance of Thomism Today” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“Theology: Queen of the Sciences” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Thomism and Philosophy in the Catholic Tradition” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

The Problem of Evil

“The Problem of Evil” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“Why Does and All-Loving God Allow Suffering?” by Camille Di Blasi, President of the Center for Life Principles

Politics

“Anti-Family Activities at the U.N.” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“The Attacks on the Holy See at the United Nations” by Austin Ruse, President of the Catholic Family and Human Rights Institute

“The Catholic Vote” by Kellyanne Fitzpatrick Conway, President of the Polling Company

“Christian Persecution (in various countries, incl. China, Sudan)” by Nina Shea, Director of the Center for Religious Freedom at Freedom House and Commissioner of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom

“Christian Political Thought” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Christianity and American Politics” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute”Church and State in Historical Perspective” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The City in Christian Thought” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Concept of Christian Civilization” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Dante’s Political Vision” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Francesco de Vitoria and Pre-Enlightenment Human Rights Politics” by John Evans, Professor of English at Arizona State University

“Free Speech” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“The Future of Religious Freedom Internationally” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“The King’s Good Servants, But God’s First: The Mission of Catholic Politicians” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“Papal Teaching on the Family, the State, and the Social Question” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Principles of a Good Political Order” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Reason and Revelation in the American Founding” by Thomas West, Professor of Politics at the University of Dallas and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Religious Freedom Worldwide” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Separating Church and State” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Socialist Man: An Intellectual Profile” by Jude P. Dougherty, Dean Emeritus of the School of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America

“Truth, Authority, and Pluralism” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The U.N.’s Threat to Life, Faith, and Family” by Austin Ruse, President of the Catholic Family and Human Rights Institute

“United Nations Social Policy” by Austin Ruse, President of the Catholic Family and Human Rights Institute

“U.S. Policy on Religious Freedom” by Nina Shea, Director of the Center for Religious Freedom at Freedom House and Commissioner of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom

“What Does Catholic Social Doctrine Have to Teach American Liberalism?” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“The Worldwide Persecution of Christians” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

Topics in Politics

Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

Deal Hudson, Editor and Publisher of Crisis Magazine

Religious Freedom/Freedom of Conscience

“The Kinds of Pluralism and Their Effects on Religious Freedom” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

“The Protection of the Religious and Conscientious Beliefs of Health Care Professionals” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

Globalization

“Globalization” by Fr. Robert Araujo S.J.: Gonzaga University School of Law, Professor of Law

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ASCC Speakers List: Faith and Theology

Apologetics/Evangelization/Catechetics

“Apologetics on the Controversial Issues in Catholicism” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“Being a Light for Christ” by Mary-Louise Kurey, Motivational Speaker, Author, Professional Singer, and Miss America Finalist

“By What Authority: An Evangelical Discovers Catholic Tradition” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Cultural Apologetics: How to Speak to Secular Neighbors about Controversial Moral and Religious Topics” by J. Budziszewski, Associate Professor of Government and Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin

“The Early Church Was the Catholic Church” by Kenneth Whitehead, United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Postsecondary Education (retired)

“Evangelization Through Friendship” by Bud Macfarlane, Jr., MI, Founder and Executive Director of the Mary Foundation, St. Jude Media, CatholiCity.com, and Founder of the Colebrook Society

“Evangelization Through the Media” by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“Friendship Evangelism” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“How Does a Catholic Explain Bad Popes, the Crusades, the Inquisition, and Burning Heretics” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Incarnational Evangelism” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Indulgences: the World’s Most Misunderstood Spiritual Gifts” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Infallibility Doesn’t Mean Never Having to Say You’re Sorry” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Knocking Down the Myths of Catholic History” by Harry Crocker, author of Triumph: The Power and the Glory of the Catholic Church

“Listening Evangelism” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Making Connections: Being a Lay Witness in a Postmodern Culture” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“The Pius XII Controversy” by Kenneth Whitehead, United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Postsecondary Education (retired)

“The Significance of the Petrine See in Early Christianity” By Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“This is My Body: An Evangelical Discovers the Real Presence” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“What’s So Great about the Catholic Church” by Harry Crocker, author of Triumph: The Power and the Glory of the Catholic Church

“Why Be a Catholic?” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

New Evangelization

“Embracing the Promise of a New Catholic Springtime” by Mary Cunningham Agee, The Nurturing Network, President and Founder; Culture of Life Foundation and Institute, Vice Chairman

“Opus Dei” By Fr. C. John McCloskey, Director of the Catholic Information Center, Washington, D.C.

Speakers in Apologetics/Catechetics/Evangelism:

Fr. C. John McCloskey, Director of the Catholic Information Center, Washington, D.C.

Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

Curtis Martin, President of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students

Conversion

“Augustine’s Confessions: Philosophical Insights Crucial to His Conversion” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J.

“Conversion” by Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Eléonore Raoul Professor of the Humanities and Professor of History

“How I Got This Way: Confessions of a Double-Jump Convert” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

Doctrine

“Authority in the Church” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Aquinas on Development of Doctrine” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“The Foundation: The Four Marks of the Church” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

Lectures on the sections of the Catechism by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

“The Basics of Christian Doctrine” by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

“Jacque Maritain on the Church of Christ” by Jude P. Dougherty, Dean Emeritus of the School of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America

“Mediation of Christ’s Authority” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Usury and Lending at Interest in the Catholic Tradition . . . Then and Now” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“What is the Church?” by Michael Dauphinais, Professor of Theology and Academic Dean at Ave Maria University

“Why Does Jesus Make a Difference Jesus Present in His Church” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

The Laity

“Calling All Catholics: The Role of the Laity Today” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“Care and Feeding of the Lay Catholic Apostolate” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Making Connections: Being a Lay Witness in a Postmodern Culture” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“The Priesthood and the Laity in the Domestic Church” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“The Role of the Catholic Laity” by Russell Shaw, Author, Editor, Journalist

Moral Theology

“Aquinas‚ Moral Theory: Law, Grace, and Virtue” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Catholic Moral Thought” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“The Catholic Moral Tradition” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“Does Everyone Establish His or Her Own Moral Truth?” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“The Foundations of Catholic Moral Theology” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“The Good News About Catholic Sexual Morality” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“Is Anything that Two People Consented to Do Together All Right because they Consented to Do It?” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“Is There Any Truth About Morality” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“The Moral Life and Christ” by Michael Dauphinais, Professor of Theology and Academic Dean at Ave Maria University

“Usury and Lending at Interest in the Catholic Tradition . . . Then and Now” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Veritatis Splendor and Bioethics” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Veritatis Splendor and the Catholic Moral Life” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Veritatis Splendor and Humanae Vitae” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

Prayer/Sacraments

“Adding a SPARK to Your Prayer Life” by Mary-Louise Kurey, Motivational Speaker, Author, Professional Singer, and Miss America Finalist

“A Basic Introduction to the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius and their Foundational Role in Jesuit Education” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“The Benedictine Way of Life” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Christ in You: His Real Presence Makes a Real Difference” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“The Eucharist: The Source of All Your Happiness: by Mary-Louise Kurey, Motivational Speaker, Author, Professional Singer, and Miss America Finalist

“Family Prayer” by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

“Faith Development in College Students” by Fr. William Watson, S.J., Vice President for Mission at Gonzaga University

“Indulgences: The World’s Most Misunderstood Spiritual Gifts” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“How to Make an Examination of Conscience: The Tradition of St. Ignatius” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Living Out a Pro-Life Spirituality within the Family” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“The Life of Prayer” by Michael Dauphinais, Professor of Theology and Academic Dean at Ave Maria University

“Praying with the Scripture” by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

“Spirituality in the Contemporary World” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Theology, Spirituality, and Biblical Exegesis of the Fathers of the Church” by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

Topics in Prayer/Sacraments by Curtis Martin, President of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students

Saints/Great Catholics

“The Active and Contemplative Lives in the Thought of Aquinas” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“An Evening with Chesterton,” One-Man Play by John C. “Chuck” Chalberg

“Aquinas‚ Moral Theory: Law, Grace, and Virtue” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Aquinas on Development of Doctrine” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Augustine’s Anthropology” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Augustine’s Confessions: Philosophical Insights Crucial to His Conversion” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“A Basic Introduction to the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius and their Foundational Role in Jesuit Education” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“Cardinal Newman” by Don Briel, Koch Chair in Catholic Studies at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas, MN.

“Chesterton and Science” by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“The Christian Gifts of J.R.R. Tolkien” by Bradley Birzer Assistant Professor of History at Hillsdale College and Senior Fellow at the Center for the American Idea in Houston

“Church Fathers Today” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“The Confessions of St. Augustine” a One-Man Play by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“C.S. Lewis and Catholicism” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

“The Ecumenism of John Paul II” by Kenneth Whitehead, United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Postsecondary Education (retired)

“The Encyclicals of Pope John Paul II” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Experiences as Gentleman in Waiting to Pope John Paul II” by Joseph Hagan, President Emeritus of Assumption College, Professor-At-Large at John Cabot University, and Gentleman-in-Waiting to Pope John Paul II

“G.K. Chesterton and C.S. Lewis: Keys to Their Apologetic Success” ” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

“Healing and the Communion of Saints” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Ignatius of Loyola and his Response to the Spiritual Crisis in the Sixteenth Century” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“Jacque Maritain on the Church of Christ” by Jude P. Dougherty, Dean Emeritus of the School of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America

“John Henry Newman” By Fr. C. John McCloskey, Director of the Catholic Information Center, Washington, D.C.

Lectures on Chesterton by John C. “Chuck” Chalberg

“The Life of St. Francis of Assisi” a One-Man Play by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“The Life of St. John of the Cross” a One-Man Play by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“The Life of St. Maximilian Kolbe” a One-Man Play by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“Literature and the Sacramental Imagination” (J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Sigrid Undset, Gerard Manley Hopkins) by Abromaitis, C.N.: Loyola College in Maryland, Professor of English

“The Men of Vatican II” by Fr. Joseph Fessio, S.J., Editor at Ignatius Press and Chancellor of Ave Maria University

“Natural Law, John Courtney Murray, and the Emergence of an Abortion Culture” by Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Newman and Catholic Higher Education” by Don Briel, Koch Chair in Catholic Studies at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas, MN.

“Newman and Science” by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“Our Everlasting Orthodoxy,” a One-Man Play by John C. “Chuck” Chalberg

“Pope John Paul II: The Man and His Mission” by Joseph Hagan, President Emeritus of Assumption College, Professor-At-Large at John Cabot University, and Gentleman-in-Waiting to Pope John Paul II

“The Philosophical background to Pope John Paul II’s Personalist Anthropology & Moral Thought” by Jorge Garcia, Professor of Philosophy at Boston College

“St. Augustine” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“St. Josemaria Escriva” By Fr. C. John McCloskey, Director of the Catholic Information Center, Washington, D.C.

“St. Thomas Aquinas: The Man Behind the Caricature” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“Theology, Spirituality, and Biblical Exegesis of the Fathers of the Church” by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

“The Two Percies” by Peter Augustine Lawler, Dana Professor of Government at Berry College

Mary

“Behold Your Mother: An Evangelical Discovers the Blessed Mother” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Mary: Ark of the Covenant” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

Topics in Mariology, Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz O.P., Dominican Sisters of Mary Mother of the Eucharist

Scripture

“Approaches to Understanding Scripture” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Deconstructing the Jesus Seminar” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“The Eucharist and the Four Senses of Scripture” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“The Gospel of John” a One-Man Play by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“The Gospel of Luke” a One-Man Play by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“How to Read the Bible: The Four Senses of Scripture” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“In Defense of Allegory” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“The Inevitability of Allegory” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“Making Sense of Scripture: Reading the Bible as the First Christians Did” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“The Many-Sided Gospel” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Natural Law and the Bible” by J. Budziszewski, Associate Professor of Government and Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin

“Psalms and the Life of Prayer” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“Praying with the Scripture” by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

“The Overall Story of the Bible” by Michael Dauphinais, Professor of Theology and Academic Dean at Ave Maria University

“Spiritual Interpretation of the Bible” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“The Song of Songs” a One-Man Play by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“Theology, Spirituality, and Biblical Exegesis of the Fathers of the Church” by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

“This is My Body: An Evangelical Discovers the Real Presence” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Understanding the Book of Revelation” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

Topics in Scripture: by Curtis Martin, President of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students

Vocations/The Religious Life

“Religious Life in the Church Today” by Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz O.P., Dominican Sisters of Mary Mother of the Eucharist

“Vocations — in Particular to the Priesthood and/or Religious Life” by Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz O.P., Dominican Sisters of Mary Mother of the Eucharist

Virtue/Ethics

“Aquinas‚ Moral Theory: Law, Grace, and Virtue” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Can We Be Good Without God?” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Catholic Moral Thought” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Courageous Virtue” by Michael Dauphinais, Professor of Theology and Academic Dean

at Ave Maria University

“Death or Love” (how virtue will save us from ideology) by Bradley Birzer Assistant Professor of History at Hillsdale College and Senior Fellow at the Center for the American Idea in Houston

“Distinguishing Intention from Foresight: What is Included in a Means to and End” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Does Everyone Establish His or Her Own Moral Truth?” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“Double Effect Reasoning” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Exceptionless Norms in Aristotle” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Is Anything that Two People Consented to Do Together All Right Because They Consented?” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“Lying: Absolutism and Consequentialism” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Medical Ethics, Reproductive Technology, and the Natural Law” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Moral Self-Deception (How We Pretend to Ourselves that We Don’t Know What We Really Do” by J. Budziszewski, Associate Professor of Government and Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin

“Natural Law Ethics” by Phillip Goggans, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Seattle Pacific University

“The New Morality” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Philosophical background to Pope John Paul II’s Personalist Anthropology & Moral

Thought” by Jorge Garcia, Professor of Philosophy at Boston College

“The ‘Principle’ of Double-Effect” by Jorge Garcia, Professor of Philosophy at Boston College

“Problems in Utilitarian Moral Theory” by Jorge Garcia, Professor of Philosophy at Boston College

“Proportionalism” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Proportionalism and Relativism” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Teleology and Deontology” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

Topics in Ethics by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“The Virtues in Moral Theory” by Jorge Garcia, Professor of Philosophy at Boston College

“Why Values Language is Ambiguous and Not Equivalent to Virtues Language” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

Topics in Virtue/Ethics by Curtis Martin, President of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students

Read More

ASCC Speakers List: Life Issues/Science

Abortion

“Abortion” by Fr. Robert Araujo S.J., Gonzaga University School of Law, Professor of Law

“Abortion and the Culture of Life” by Charles E. Rice, Professor Emeritus of Law at the University of Notre Dame School of Law and Visiting Professor at the Ave Maria University School of Law

“Abortion and the Right to Life” by L. Brent Bozell, Founder and President of the Media Research Center and the Parents Television Council

“The Connection Between Contraception and Abortion” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The Connection Between Contraception, Abortion, and Euthanasia” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The Feminist Case Against Abortion” by Serrin Foster, president of Feminists for Life

“Law and History of Abortion” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Natural Law, John Courtney Murray, and the Emergence of an Abortion Culture” by Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“What is Wrong with Pro-Choice Arguments for Abortion and Euthanasia” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

Topics on Abortion: by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

Capital Punishment

“Capital Punishment and Euthanasia” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The Death Penalty” by Richard Garnett, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Notre Dame School of Law

“The Morality of the Death Penalty” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Papal Teaching on the Death Penalty” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Why the Death Penalty? Capital Punishment in the Catholic Tradition” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

Chastity/Modesty

“Chastity” by Camille Di Blasi, President of the Center for Life Principles

“Raising Chaste Children” by Richard Wetzel, M.D., author of Sexual Wisdom: A Guide for Parents, Young Adults, Educators, and Physicians

“Standing with Courage” by Mary-Louise Kurey, Motivational Speaker, Author, Professional Singer, and Miss America Finalist

“Modesty” by Camille Di Blasi, President of the Center for Life Principles

Cloning/Stem Cell Research

“A Consumer’s Guide to the Brave New World” by Wesley J. Smith, Senior Fellow at the Discovery Institute

“Cloning and Stem Cell Research” by Kenneth Whitehead, United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Postsecondary Education (retired)

“Human Cloning” by Fr. Robert Araujo S.J., Gonzaga University School of Law, Professor of Law

“Fetal Research” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

Contraception/Natural Family Planning

“The Case Against Contraception” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“The Catholic Catechism and Contraception” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“The Church’s Teaching on Contraception: A Woman’s Friend or Foe?” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary

“The Connection Between Contraception and Abortion” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“The Connection Between Contraception, Abortion, and Euthanasia” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary

“Contraception: A Couple’s Friend or Foe?” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“Contraception: Gateway to the Culture of Death” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Contraception: Why Not” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“The Differences Between Contraception and Natural Family Planning” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary

“Humanae Vitae” by John Mallon, Contributing Editor of Inside the VaticanMagazine

“Humanae Vitae and Conscience” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“Humanae Vitae: Sense or Nonsense?” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“The Moral Differences Between Natural Family Planning and Artificial Contraception” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“Natural Family Planning, Humanae Vitae, and Evangelium Vitae” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“Natural Law Arguments Against Contraception” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“Pope John Paul II’s Arguments Against Contraception” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“Population Control and the Catholic Church’s Teaching on Contraception” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“Veritatis Splendor and Humanae Vitae” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“Why the Proportionalists Are Wrong About Contraception” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

Natural Family Planning

“The Moral Differences Between Natural Family Planning and Artificial Contraception” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“Natural Family Planning” by Richard Wetzel, M.D., author of Sexual Wisdom: A Guide for Parents, Young Adults, Educators, and Physicians

“Natural Family Planning and Its Positive Effects Within a Marriage As Shown by a Recent Study” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“Natural Family Planning, Humanae Vitae, and Evangelium Vitae” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

Culture of Life/The Family

“Anti-Family Activities at the U.N” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“Bioethics” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Bioethics: Creating a Disposable Caste of People?” by Wesley J. Smith, Senior Fellow at the Discovery Institute

“Catholic Bioethical Principles and Applications to Beginning and End of Life

Issues” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“Communicating the Culture of Life: A Personal Call to Holiness” by Mary Cunningham Agee: The Nurturing Network, President and Founder; Culture of Life Foundation and Institute, Vice Chairman

“A Culture of Life vs. a Culture of Death” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The Culture of Life vs. the Culture of Death” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“The Destructive ‘Sex Education’ Programs in Use at Catholic and Public Schools” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“Evangelium Vitae: An Overview” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“The Fallacy of Brain Death” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“Family as Icon of the Blessed Trinity” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“The Family Under Siege” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“Four Legs Good, Two Legs Bad — The Anti-Human Values of Animal Rights” by Wesley J. Smith, Senior Fellow at the Discovery Institute

“The Good News About Catholic Sexual Morality” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“Living Out a Pro-Life Spirituality within the Family” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“Medical Ethics, Reproductive Technology, and the Natural Law” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“The Modern vs. the Christian View of the Human Person” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The Myth of Overpopulation” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The New Sexual Revolution Takes Charge! (The Changing Landscape of Sexual Mores in America” by Mary-Louise Kurey, Motivational Speaker, Author, Professional Singer, and Miss America Finalist

“Objective Truth and the Culture of Death” by Richard Wetzel, M.D., author of SexualWisdom: A Guide for Parents, Young Adults, Educators, and Physicians

“The Philosophy of the Pro-Life Movement” by Camille Di Blasi, President of the Center for Life Principles

“Pro-Life 101” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“Quality of Life and the Culture of Life. An Either/Or?” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“The Reality of Organ Donation and Transplantation” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“Theological Andrology: What it Means to Be a Real Man from God’s Point of View” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“The U.N.’s Threat to Life, Faith, and Family” by Austin Ruse, President of the Catholic Family and Human Rights Institute

“Veritatis Splendor and Bioethics” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Veritatis Splendor and the Catholic Moral Life” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Whence and Whither the Pro-Life Movement?” by Connaught Marshner, President of the American Catholic Council

General Speakers on Pro-Life Issues:

Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Eléonore Raoul Professor of the Humanities and Professor of History

Mary Beth Bonacci, Real Love Productions

Maggie Gallagher, author and syndicated columnist

Margaret Monahan Hogan, Chair of the Philosophy Department at King’s College, President of the Center for Academic Integrity at Duke University, and Fellow at the Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture

Euthanasia

“Capital Punishment and Euthanasia” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The Connection Between Contraception, Abortion, and Euthanasia” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary

Lectures on Euthanasia by Camille Di Blasi, President of the Center for Life Principles

“The Slippery Slope from Assisted Suicide to Legalized Murder” by Wesley J. Smith, Senior Fellow at the Discovery Institute

“What is Wrong with Pro-Choice Arguments for Abortion and Euthanasia” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

Faith and Science

“Chesterton and Science” by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“The Christian Origin of Science” by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“Galileo the Scientist” (3 lectures) by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“Newman and Science” by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“The Implications of Quantum Mechanics” by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“Refuting Triumphalist Enlightenment Notions About Science” by Michael Tkacz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University

“Science and Belief” (8 lectures) by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“Theology and the New Physics” by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

Animal Intelligence

“Philosophers in the Mist” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“Did Doctor Doolittle Get It Wrong?” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

Evolution/Darwinism/Intelligent Design

“Darwinian Evolution” by Michael Behe, Professor of Biochemistry at Lehigh University

“Intelligent Design of Life” by Michael Behe, Professor of Biochemistry at Lehigh University

“The Catholic Church and Evolution” by Michael Behe, Professor of Biochemistry at Lehigh University

“Darwin’s Black Box” by Michael Behe, Professor of Biochemistry at Lehigh University

“The Problem of Evolution: a Philosopher Assays Naturalism” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

Marriage and Dating

“Choosing a Mate for Life” by Connaught Marshner, President of the American Catholic Council

“The Church’s View of Marriage” by Michael Dauphinais, Professor of Theology and Academic Dean at Ave Maria University

“Marital Acts Without Marital Vows” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Marriage: a Person-Affirming, Love-Enabling, Life-Giving, and Sanctifying Reality” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Marriage and Sexual Ethics” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“The Nature of Marriage” by Margaret Monahan Hogan, Chair of the Philosophy Department at King’s College, President of the Center for Academic Integrity at Duke University, and Fellow at the Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture

“Understanding Catholic Declarations of Nullity” By Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

General Speakers on Marriage/Dating:

Curtis Martin, President of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students

Maggie Gallagher: Author and Syndicated Columnist

Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

Human Sexuality/Theology of the Body

“Catholic Moral Teachings on Love and Sexuality” by John Mallon, Contributing Editor of Inside the Vatican Magazine

“The Christian Meaning of Human Sexuality” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Dating and Relationships” by Mary Beth Bonacci, Real Love Productions

“Human Sexuality” by Mary Beth Bonacci, Real Love Productions

“The Modern vs. the Christian View of Human Sexuality” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“Natural Family Planning” by Richard Wetzel, M.D., author of Sexual Wisdom: A Guide for Parents, Young Adults, Educators, and Physicians

“Natural Family Planning, Humanae Vitae, and Evangelium Vitae” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“Pornography” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“The Sexual Mess That We Are In and How We Got Here” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The Sexual Revolution: Fifty Years Later” by Donald Critchlow, Professor of History at Saint Louis University

“Where the Sexual Revolution Has Gone Wrong” by Richard Wetzel, M.D., author of Sexual Wisdom: A Guide for Parents, Young Adults, Educators, and Physicians

“Why Premarital Sex is Wrong” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

General Speaker on Human Sexuality: Maggie Gallagher, Author and Syndicated Columnist

Theology of the Body

“The Dignity of the Human Person and John Paul II’s Theology of the Body” by Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz O.P., Dominican Sisters of Mary Mother of the Eucharist

“Pope John Paul II’s Theology of the Body” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“The Theology of the Body of Pope John Paul II” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

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Press Releases

Bishops Back Out of Commencement Ceremonies

May 22, 2003

Following protests by Cardinal Newman Society, three bishops have canceled planned appearances at the commencement ceremonies of the College of the Holy Cross (MA), College Misericordia (PA) and the University of Scranton (PA).

Cardinal Newman Society has protested the selection of MSNBC commentator Chris Matthews to speak at both the University of Scranton and the College of the Holy Cross because of his abortion-rights position.  In his television commentary and newspaper columns, Matthews has publicly
declared “I’m for abortion rights,” even appearing to endorse partial-birth abortion for severely handicapped babies.

Bishop James Timlin of Scranton, Pennsylvania, will not attend the University of Scranton’s commencement ceremony on Sunday, citing a policy of refusing to share a stage with public abortion-rights advocates. Bishop Daniel Reilly of Worcester, Massachusetts, announced yesterday that
he will not attend tomorrow’s Holy Cross ceremony for the same reason.

“Holy Cross will confer an honorary degree on a Catholic person who publicly espouses the view that, in some cases, people have a right to terminate a life in the womb,” Bishop Reilly said.  “I cannot let my
presence imply support for anything less than the protection of all life at all its stages.”

Alumni are protesting the selection of Matthews, led by the Holy Cross Cardinal Newman Society (www.hccns.org) and Charles Millard, who chaired the Holy Cross board of trustees from 1977-1982 and served another 22 years as a trustee.  Rev. Richard John Neuhaus, editor of First Things
magazine and president of the Religion & Public Life Institute, also weighed in last month with a statement critical of the college.

Holy Cross president Rev. Michael McFarland, S.J., has responded to the protests by falsely claiming that Matthews’ views are consistent with Catholic teaching.

Auxiliary Bishop John Dougherty of Scranton, an advisor to Cardinal Newman Society, did not attend College Misericordia’s ceremony on Saturday because of concerns about the commencement speakers, journalists Cokie and Steven Roberts.

Although Cokie has written in the couple’s syndicated column that she “tends to favor pro-life arguments,” her husband, “who is Jewish, is more sympathetic to the pro-choice side” (May 25, 1997).  Steve’s writings portray both pro-life and radical feminist activists as extreme, whereas the “middle” or “moderate” position agrees “that a woman has a right to choose abortion, but the right is not unlimited” (U.S. News & World Report, April 12, 1993).  The Roberts’ joint column also has repeatedly echoed Steve’s call for “moderation” on the abortion issue, endorsing restrictions on abortion but espousing abortion rights.  The Roberts have labeled those who respect the dignity of all human life as extremists,
while labeling individuals like Christine Todd Whitman–who vetoed a ban on partial-birth abortion–as moderates.

The Cardinal Newman Society protest is part of its annual survey of commencement speakers whose public actions and statements are opposed to Catholic teaching.  See www.cardinalnewmansociety.org for a complete list.  The Society has teamed up with the American Life League (www.all.org),
which is also protesting pro-abortion commencement speakers as part of its “Crusade for the Defense of our Catholic Church.”

Catholic Colleges Alter Websites That Sent Students to Planned Parenthood

December 10, 2002

FALLS CHURCH, VA — Catholic universities that promote Planned Parenthood on their websites are feeling the heat of recent publicity and public outrage, with at least two of them quickly removing or hiding the offensive web pages following negative publicity.

Early this week, leaders of the Association of Students at Catholic Colleges (ASCC) and its parent organization, the national Cardinal Newman Society, complained that the websites of at least eight Catholic universities in the United States directed students to Planned Parenthood for information, services, and even employment.  ASCC and the Cardinal Newman Society are dedicated to the renewal of Catholic identity in Catholic higher education.

LifeSite News (www.lifesite.net) and several pro-life organizations reported the scandal, which involves Boston College; DePaul University in Chicago; Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.; John Carroll University in Cleveland; Loyola University of Chicago; Santa Clara University; Seattle University; and the University of San Francisco.  DePaul is a Vincentian university; the other seven are Jesuit institutions.

Where the University of San Francisco once posted a “Pregnancy” page (www.usfca.edu/shep/pregnancy.htm) linked to promotions for Planned Parenthood and the local Women’s Community Clinic, the site now reads, “This portion of the web site is currently being reviewed.”  But although the links have been removed, the pages promoting Planned Parenthood and the Women’s Community Clinic are still online at www.usfca.edu/shep/pregnancy_link2.htm and www.usfca.edu/shep/pregnancy_link1.htm.  USF touts Planned Parenthood as a source for pregnancy testing and counseling, birth control, and emergency contraception (which causes early abortion), but it fails to mention Planned Parenthood’s role as the nation’s leading abortion provider.  The Women’s Community Clinic provides pregnancy testing and counseling and referrals to abortion clinics.

Georgetown University apparently removed a “sex health and safety” page from its website after LifeSite News reported that the page linked to a Planned Parenthood website, promoted the morning after pill (an abortifacient), and encouraged the use of sexual aids including dental dams and latex gloves for “safer sex.”  But the page, formerly at www.georgetown.edu/student-affairs/healthed/sex.htm, is still identified by the website’s search engine.  Georgetown’s website continues to promote the use of condoms and dental dams on its “STDs/HIV” page (www.georgetown.edu/student-affairs/healthed/stdhiv.htm).

“The website changes are heartening, but they are just the beginning,” said Thomas Harmon, ASCC President and a senior at Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington.  “We intend to ensure that all of these web links are removed from the universities’ sites.”

The websites are only the latest signs of Catholic universities’ reluctance to implement Ex corde Ecclesiae, Pope John Paul II’s 1990 apostolic constitution on Catholic higher education.

“In Ex Corde Ecclesiae, one of the requirements of a Catholic university is that all official actions and commitments must be in accord with the university’s Catholic identity,” said Patrick Reilly, President of the Cardinal Newman Society.  “Anything that is announced or promoted by a university’s website is an official action.  By promoting Planned Parenthood or taking any step that might drive students toward Planned Parenthood for an abortion is not only a violation of Ex Corde Ecclesiae, but also a scandal and a terrible crime against young women.”

In a Vatican address last Thursday, Pope John Paul II demanded that Catholic university administrators “be vigilant in maintaining rectitude and Catholic principles in teaching and research in the heart of their university. It is clear that university centers that do not respect the Church’s laws and the teaching of the Magisterium, especially in bioethics, cannot be defined as Catholic universities.”

“Catholic college students are leading the renewal of Catholic higher education,” Harmon said.  “ASCC’s emphasis is on positive campus programs to teach and promote the Catholic faith, but when an outcry is needed, college administrators will hear us loud and clear.”

Other websites protested by ASCC include:

 

  • Boston College provides a toll-free number to Planned Parenthood in its listing of local “Hospitals and Clinics” at www.bc.edu/bc_org/svp/house/offcampus/phone.htm.

 

 

  • DePaul University’s Department of Sociology offers internships at Planned Parenthood (http://condor.depaul.edu/~soc/undergraduate_descriptions.htm), and its Women’s Studies Program lists Planned Parenthood among several career opportunities for its students (http://condor.depaul.edu/~wms/careers.html).
  • The Student Health Center at John Carroll University (www.jcu.edu/studentl/Health%20Services/information.htm) lists Planned Parenthood among its “counseling sites.”
  • The Women’s Studies Program at Loyola University of Chicago (www.luc.edu/depts/women_stu/links.html) provides links to Planned Parenthood as well as pro-abortion organizations including the National Organization for Women and the Feminist Majority Foundation.
  • Santa Clara University refers students to Planned Parenthood (www.scu.edu/SCU/Projects/SourceBook/Medical/menu.htm ), explicitly touting abortion, pregnancy testing, and family planning.  The university’s Student Health Center promotes a website, noting that “one of the best things about this site” is its links to resources like Planned Parenthood.
  • Seattle University’s Wismer Center, an interdisciplinary program to address issues of diversity and justice, includes among its “Activism” resources (www.seattleu.edu/wismer/links.htm) links to Planned Parenthood, the National Organization for Women, and the Feminist Majority Foundation.  The university’s Wellness and Prevention Center page (www.seattleu.edu/student/wellness/Resources2001v2.html) also links to Planned Parenthood and the Seattle Gay Clinic for HIV/AIDS testing and to pro-contraception websites like www.unspeakable.com for information on sexually transmitted diseases.

For more information about ASCC or Cardinal Newman Society, see the organizations’ websites at www.catholiccollegestudents.org and www.cardinalnewmansociety.org or call (703) 367-0333.

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What do the Saints and Other Holy People Say?

St. Francis of AssisiGood Shepherd

Good Shepherd

“Everything in man should halt in awe. Let all the world quake and let Heaven exult when Christ the Son of the living God is there on the altar.”

“In this world I cannot see the Most High Son of God with my own eyes, except for His Most Holy Body and Blood.”

“And just as He appeared before the holy Apostles in true flesh, they saw only His Flesh, but regarding Him with the eyes of the spirit, they believed that He was God. In like manner, as we see bread and wine with our bodily eyes, let us see and believe firmly that it is His Most Holy Body and Blood, True and Living.”

“We adore Thee most holy Lord Jesus Christ, here in all Thy Churches, which are in the whole world, because by thy holy cross, Thou hast redeemed the world.”

St. Augustine

“Christ held Himself in His hands when he gave his Body to His disciples saying: ‘This is My Body.’ No one partakes of this Flesh before he has adored it.”

“We do not sin when we adore Christ in the Eucharist; we do sin when we do not adore Christ in the Eucharist.”

Kimberly Hahn

“And because Jesus is the Eucharist, keeping Him in the center allows all of the rich doctrines of the Church to emanate from Him, just as the beautiful gold rays stream forth from the Host in the monstrance.”

Mother Teresa of Calcutta

“The humility of Jesus can be seen in the crib, in the exile to Egypt, in the inability to make people understand Him, in the desertion of His apostles, in the hatred of His persecutors, in all the terrible suffering and death of His Passion, and now in His permanent state of humility in the tabernacle, where he has reduced Himself to such a small particle of bread that the priest can hold Him with two fingers. The more we empty ourselves, the more room we give God to fill us.”

“People ask me: ‘What will convert America and save the world?’ My answer is prayer. What we need is for every parish to come before Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament in Holy Hours of prayer.”

“To be alone with Jesus in adoration and intimate union with Him is the Greatest Gift of Love – the tender love our Father in Heaven.”

“When you look at the Crucifix, you understand how much Jesus loved you then. When you look at the Sacred Host you understand how much Jesus loves you now.”

His Holiness, Pope John Paul II

“Every member of the Church must be vigilant in seeing that this sacrament of love shall be at the center of the life of the people of God so that through all manifestations of worship due to it, Christ shall be given back ‘love for love,’ and truly become the life of our souls.”

“The encouragement and the deepening of Eucharistic worship are proofs of the authentic renewal which the Council set itself as an aim and of which they are the central point.” (Dominicae Cenae)

St. Peter Julian Eymard

“Today solemn exposition of the Blessed Sacrament is the grace and need of our time. Society will be restored and renewed when all its members group themselves around our Emmanuel.”

“Let us never forget that an age prospers or dwindles in proportion to its devotion to the Holy Eucharist. This is the measure of its spiritual life and its faith, of its charity and its virtue.”

“In one day the Eucharist will make you produce more for the glory of God than a whole lifetime without it.”

“Until we have a passionate love for our Lord in the Most Blessed Sacred we shall accomplish nothing.”

“The Eucharist is the supreme proof of the love of Jesus. After this, there is nothing more but Heaven itself.”

Pere Jean du Coeur de Jesus D’Elbee

“What is the work of grace? The transformation of our souls into Jesus through love. St. Thomas shows us, after St. Augustine, that the Eucharist transforms out souls into Jesus through love. It is there that I find the definition of sanctity, the world.”

Francois Mauriac

“The temples of those who deny the Real Presence are like corpses. The Lord was taken away and we do not know where they have laid Him.”

Office for the Feast of Corpus Christi

“The Bread of heaven puts an end to symbols.”

St. John of the Cross

“Lord, I shall see you no more with the eyes of flesh…”

Peter Kreeft

“Adoration will heal our Church and thus our nation and thus our world…. Adoration is more powerful for construction than nuclear bombs are for

destruction.”

St. Alphonsus Ligouri

“Certainly amongst all devotions, after the sacraments, that of adoring Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament holds first place, it is the most pleasing to God, and the most useful to ourselves. Do not then, O devout soul, refuse to begin this devotion; and forsaking the conversation of men, dwell each day, from this time forward, far at least half or quarter of an hour, in some church, in the presence of Jesus Christ under the sacramental species. Taste and see how sweet is the Lord.”

“My Jesus! What a lovable contrivance this holy Sacrament was – that You would hide under the appearance of bread to make Yourself loved and to be available for a visit by anyone who desires you!”

St. Euphrasia Pelletier, Foundress of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd

“To speak of the Blessed Sacrament is to speak of what is most sacred. How often, when we are in a state of distress, those to whom we look for help leave us; or what is worse, add to our affliction by heaping fresh troubles upon us. He is ever there waiting for us.”

Pope St. Pius X

“The devotion to the Eucharist is the most noble because it has God as its object; it is the most profitable for salvation, because It gives us the Author of Grace; it is the sweetest, because the Lord is Sweetness Itself.”

St. Francis de Sales

“We must visit Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament a hundred thousand times a day.”

Ricardo J. Cardinal Vidal, Archbishop of Cebu

“Perpetual Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament is the Solution to our problems of declining vocations.”

St. Peter of Alcantara

“Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament has His hands full of graces, and He is ready to bestow them on anyone who asks for them.”

Hebrews 4:16

“Let us go with confidence to the Throne of Grace that we may obtain mercy and find grace.”

St. Dominic Savio

“Do you want many graces? Go and visit the Blessed Sacrament often. Do you want few graces? Visit the Blessed Sacrament rarely. Do you want none at all? Then never pay a visit to the Blessed Sacrament.”

Jean Galot, S.J.

“By His Eucharistic presence, Christ dwells in our midst. Out of love He has enriched the Church with his unceasing presence. As God in former days dwelt in the temple of Jerusalem, He now lives in our churches and chapels. He invites us to remain in close contact with Him. Through Eucharistic adoration we concentrate our attention on Him as we yield to the fascination of His invisible gaze. Opening our heart, we entrust all our petitions to Him.”

Fr. Stefano Manelli, O.F.M. Conv., S.T.D.

“All expressions of love, even the highest and the most profound, are verified in the Eucharist. Thus, it is a Love that is crucified, a Love that unites, a Love that adores, a Love that contemplates, a Love that prays, a Love that delightfully satisfies.”

St. Teresa of Avila

“In the presence of Jesus in the Holy Sacrament we ought to be like the Blessed in heaven before the Divine Essence.”

St. Philip

“Can you feel the fragrance of Paradise which diffuses Itself from the Tabernacle?”

Br. Ephraim

“It’s as if we expose ourselves to the sun and its beneficial influence.”

St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

“Let every knee bend before Thee, O greatness of my God, so supremely humbled in the Sacred Host. May every heart love Thee, every spirit adore Thee and every will be subject to Thee.”

Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen

“Neither theological knowledge nor social action alone is enough to keep us in love with Christ unless both are proceeded by a personal encounter with Him. Theological insights are gained not only from between two covers of a book, but from two bent knees before an altar. The Holy Hour becomes like an oxygen tank to revive the breath of the Holy Spirit in the midst of the foul and fetid atmosphere of the world.”

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ASCC Student Conference 2003

The Eucharist on Campus

Sunday, November 9, 2003

Washington, D.C.

Keynote Speaker:

Fr. Pacwa

Fr. Mitch Pacwa, S.J.

Rev. Mitchell Pacwa, S.J. received his B.A. in Philosophy and Theology from the University of Detroit, Summa cum laude. He received his Master of Divinity and S.T.B. from the Jesuit School of Theology of Loyola University, Magna cum laude. He was ordained a Catholic priest in 1976 and then continued his studies receiving a Ph.D. in Old Testament from Vanderbilt University in 1984. He has taught at the high school, university and seminary levels. He has lectured at conferences and churches around the world and has appeared and hosted hundreds of international radio and television programs.

His fluency in twelve languages, including Biblical languages, Arabic, and European languages, plus his extensive travels throughout the Middle East for over 20 years, has afforded him a unique understanding of the peoples and cultures of the Middle East. As a Jesuit Priest, Catholic Theologian and Teacher, Father Pacwa is best known for hosting hundreds of programs on the Eternal Word Television Network – better known as “EWTN” where he currently hosts two Programs – “Threshold of Hope”, “EWTN LIVE.” In addition, Father Pacwa can be seen several times daily on EWTN praying “The Holy Rosary in the Holy Land.” He has visited the Holy Land 44 times, leading over 1,000 Pilgrims to Jerusalem. Father Pacwa has authored two books: Father Forgive Me for I am Frustrated and Catholics and the New Age. Hundreds of his video and audio tapes are produced and distributed through his new Catholic apostolate “Ignatius Productions” (founded in 2000) — which is incorporated under the Chicago Province of the Society of Jesus. Ignatius Productions films Father Pacwa teaching at holy places and shrines around the world.

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ENCYCLICAL OF POPE PAUL VI

ON THE HOLY EUCHARIST

SEPTEMBER 3, 1965

To His Venerable Brothers the Patriarchs, Primates, Archbishops, Bishops and other Local Ordinaries in Peace and Communion with the Apostolic See, and to the Clergy and Faithful of the Entire World.

Venerable Brothers and Dear Sons, Health and Apostolic Benediction.

The Mystery of Faith, that is, the ineffable gift of the Eucharist that the Catholic Church received from Christ, her Spouse, as a pledge of His immense love, is something that she has always devoutly guarded as her most precious treasure, and during the Second Vatican Council she professed her faith and veneration in a new and solemn declaration. In dealing with the restoration of the sacred liturgy, the Fathers of the Council were led by their pastoral concern for the whole Church to regard it as a matter of highest importance to urge the faithful to participate actively, with undivided faith and the utmost devotion, in the celebration of this Most Holy Mystery, to offer it to God along with the priest as a sacrifice for their own salvation and that of the whole world, and to use it as spiritual nourishment.

2. For if the sacred liturgy holds first place in the life of the Church, then the Eucharistic Mystery stands at the heart and center of the liturgy, since it is the font of life that cleanses us and strengthens us to live not for ourselves but for God and to be united to each other by the closest ties of love.

Reaffirmation by Vatican II

3. In order to make the indissoluble bond that exists between faith and devotion perfectly clear, the Fathers of the Council decided, in the course of reaffirming the doctrine that the Church has always held and taught and that was solemnly defined by the Council of Trent, to offer the following compendium of truths as an introduction to their treatment of the Most Holy Mystery of the Eucharist:

4. “At the Last Supper, on the night when He was betrayed, our Savior instituted the Eucharistic Sacrifice of His Body and Blood. He did this in order to perpetuate the Sacrifice of the Cross throughout the centuries until He should come again, and so to entrust to His beloved Spouse, the Church, a memorial of His Death and Resurrection: a sacrament of love, a sign of unity, a bond of charity, a paschal banquet in which Christ is eaten, the mind is filled with grace, and a pledge of future glory is given to us.”

Both Sacrifice and Sacrament Highlighted

5. These words highlight both the sacrifice, which pertains to the essence of the Mass that is celebrated daily, and the sacrament in which those who participate in it through holy Communion eat the flesh of Christ and drink the blood of Christ, and thus receive grace, which is the beginning of eternal life, and the “medicine of immortality” according to Our Lord’s words: “The man who eats my flesh and drinks my blood enjoys eternal life, and I will raise him up on the last day.” (2)

Restoration of Liturgy Linked to Eucharistic Devotion

6. And so We earnestly hope that the restoration of the sacred liturgy will produce abundant fruits in the form of Eucharistic devotion, so that the Holy Church may, with this salvific sign of piety raised on high, make daily progress toward the full achievement of unity, (3) inviting all Christians to a unity of faith and love and drawing them to it gently, through the action of divine grace.

7. We seem to have a preview of these fruits and a first taste of them in the outpouring of joy and eagerness that has marked the reception the sons of the Catholic Church have accorded to the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy and to the restoration of the liturgy; and we find these fruits too in the large number of carefully-edited publications that make it their purpose to go into the doctrine of the Holy Eucharist more profoundly and to come to a more fruitful understanding of it, especially in terms of its relationship to the mystery of the Church.

8. All of this brings Us deep consolation and joy. And it gives Us great pleasure to inform you of this, Venerable Brothers, so that you may join with Us in giving thanks to God, the bestower of all gifts, who rules the Church and makes her grow in virtue through His Spirit.

REASONS FOR PASTORAL CONCERN AND ANXIETY

9. There are, however, Venerable Brothers, a number of reasons for serious pastoral concern and anxiety in this very matter that we are now discussing, and because of Our consciousness of Our Apostolic office, We cannot remain silent about them.

False and Disturbing Opinions

10. For We can see that some of those who are dealing with this Most Holy Mystery in speech and writing are disseminating opinions on Masses celebrated in private or on the dogma of transubstantiation that are disturbing the minds of the faithful and causing them no small measure of confusion about matters of faith, just as if it were all right for someone to take doctrine that has already been defined by the Church and consign it to oblivion or else interpret it in such a way as to weaken the genuine meaning of the words or the recognized force of the concepts involved.

11. To give an example of what We are talking about, it is not permissible to extol the so-called “community” Mass in such a way as to detract from Masses that are celebrated privately; or to concentrate on the notion of sacramental sign as if the symbolism—which no one will deny is certainly present in the Most Blessed Eucharist—fully expressed and exhausted the manner of Christ’s presence in this Sacrament; or to discuss the mystery of transubstantiation without mentioning what the Council of Trent had to say about the marvelous conversion of the whole substance of the bread into the Body and the whole substance of the wine into the Blood of Christ, as if they involve nothing more than “transignification,” or “transfinalization” as they call it; or, finally, to propose and act upon the opinion that Christ Our Lord is no longer present in the consecrated Hosts that remain after the celebration of the sacrifice of the Mass has been completed.

12. Everyone can see that the spread of these and similar opinions does great harm to belief in and devotion to the Eucharist.

Purpose of the Encyclical

13. And so, with the aim of seeing to it that the hope to which the Council has given rise—that a new wave of Eucharistic devotion will sweep over the Church—not be reduced to nil through the sowing of the seeds of false opinions, We have decided to use Our apostolic authority and speak Our mind to you on this subject, Venerable Brothers.

14. We certainly do not deny that those who are spreading these strange opinions are making a praiseworthy effort to investigate this lofty Mystery and to set forth its inexhaustible riches and to make it more understandable to the men of today; rather, We acknowledge this and We approve of it. But We cannot approve the opinions that they set forth, and We have an obligation to warn you about the grave danger that these opinions involve for true faith.

HOLY EUCHARIST A MYSTERY OF FAITH

15. First of all, We want to recall something that you know very well but that is absolutely necessary if the virus of every kind of rationalism is to be repelled; it is something that many illustrious martyrs have witnessed to with their blood, something that celebrated fathers and Doctors of the Church have constantly professed and taught. We mean the fact that the Eucharist is a very great mystery—in fact, properly speaking and in the words of the Sacred Liturgy, the mystery of faith. “It contains within it,” as Leo XIII, Our predecessor of happy memory, very wisely remarked, “all supernatural realities in a remarkable richness and variety of miracles.” (4)

Relying on Revelation, Not Reason

16. And so we must approach this mystery in particular with humility and reverence, not relying on human reasoning, which ought to hold its peace, but rather adhering firmly to divine Revelation.

17. St. John Chrysostom who, as you know, dealt with the Mystery of the Eucharist in such eloquent language and with such insight born of devotion, had these most fitting words to offer on one occasion when he was instructing his faithful about this mystery: “Let us submit to God in all things and not contradict Him, even if what He says seems to contradict our reason and intellect; let His word prevail over our reason and intellect. Let us act in this way with regard to the Eucharistic mysteries, and not limit our attention just to what can be perceived by the senses, but instead hold fast to His words. For His word cannot deceive.” (5)

18. The scholastic Doctors made similar statements on more than one occasion. As St. Thomas says, the fact that the true body and the true blood of Christ are present in this Sacrament “cannot be apprehended by the senses but only by faith, which rests upon divine authority. This is why Cyril comments upon the words, This is my body which is delivered up for you, in Luke 22, 19, in this way: Do not doubt that this is true; instead accept the words of the Savior in faith; for since He is truth, He cannot tell a lie.” (6)

19. Hence the Christian people often follow the lead of St. Thomas and sing the words: “Sight, touch and taste in Thee are each deceived; The ear alone most safely is believed. I believe all the Son of God has spoken; Than truth’s own word, there is no truer token.”

20. And St. Bonaventure declares: “There is no difficulty over Christ’s being present in the sacrament as in a sign; the great difficulty is in the fact that He is really in the sacrament, as He is in heaven. And so believing this is especially meritorious. ” (7)

Example of the Apostles

21. Moreover, the Holy Gospel alludes to this when it tells of the many disciples of Christ who turned away and left Our Lord, after hearing Him speak of eating His flesh and drinking His blood. “This is strange talk,” they said. “Who can be expected to listen to it” Peter, on the contrary, replied to Jesus’ question as to whether the twelve wanted to go away too by promptly and firmly expressing his own faith and that of the other Apostles in these marvelous words: “Lord, to whom should we go? Thy words are the words of eternal life.” (8)

22. It is only logical, then, for us to follow the magisterium of the Church as a guiding star in carrying on our investigations into this mystery, for the Divine Redeemer has entrusted the safeguarding and the explanation of the written or transmitted word of God to her. And we are convinced that “whatever has been preached and believed throughout the whole Church with true Catholic faith since the days of antiquity is true, even if it not be subject to rational investigation, and even if it not be explained in words.” (9)

Proper Wording of Great Importance

23. But this is not enough. Once the integrity of the faith has been safeguarded, then it is time to guard the proper way of expressing it, lest our careless use of words give rise, God forbid, to false opinions regarding faith in the most sublime things. St. Augustine gives a stern warning about this when he takes up the matter of the different ways of speaking that are employed by the philosophers on the one hand and that ought to be used by Christians on the other. “The philosophers,” he says, “use words freely, and they have no fear of offending religious listeners in dealing with subjects that are difficult to understand. But we have to speak in accordance with a fixed rule, so that a lack of restraint in speech on our part may not give rise to some irreverent opinion about the things represented by the words.” (l0)

24. And so the rule of language which the Church has established through the long labor of centuries, with the help of the Holy Spirit, and which she has confirmed with the authority of the Councils, and which has more than once been the watchword and banner of orthodox faith, is to be religiously preserved, and no one may presume to change it at his own pleasure or under the pretext of new knowledge. Who would ever tolerate that the dogmatic formulas used by the ecumenical councils for the mysteries of the Holy Trinity and the Incarnation be judged as no longer appropriate for men of our times, and let others be rashly substituted for them? In the same way, it cannot be tolerated that any individual should on his own authority take something away from the formulas which were used by the Council of Trent to propose the Eucharistic Mystery for our belief. These formulas—like the others that the Church used to propose the dogmas of faith—express concepts that are not tied to a certain specific form of human culture, or to a certain level of scientific progress, or to one or another theological school. Instead they set forth what the human mind grasps of reality through necessary and universal experience and what it expresses in apt and exact words, whether it be in ordinary or more refined language. For this reason, these formulas are adapted to all men of all times and all places.

Greater Clarity of Expression Always Possible

25. They can, it is true, be made clearer and more obvious; and doing this is of great benefit. But it must always be done in such a way that they retain the meaning in which they have been used, so that with the advance of an understanding of the faith, the truth of faith will remain unchanged. For it is the teaching of the First Vatican Council that “the meaning that Holy Mother the Church has once declared, is to be retained forever, and no pretext of deeper understanding ever justifies any deviation from that meaning.” (11)

EUCHARISTIC MYSTERY IN SACRIFICE OF THE MASS

26. For the joy and edification of everyone, We would like to review with you, Venerable Brothers, the doctrine on the Mystery of the Eucharist that has been handed down, and that the Catholic Church holds and teaches with unanimity.

Re-enactment at Heart of Doctrine

27. It is a good idea to recall at the very outset what may be termed the heart and core of the doctrine, namely that, by means of the Mystery of the Eucharist, the Sacrifice of the Cross which was once carried out on Calvary is re-enacted in wonderful fashion and is constantly recalled, and its salvific power is applied to the forgiving of the sins we commit each day.” (12)

28. just as Moses made the Old Testament sacred with the blood of calves, (13) so too Christ the Lord took the New Testament, of which He is the Mediator, and made it sacred through His own blood, in instituting the mystery of the Eucharist. For, as the Evangelists narrate, at the Last Supper “he took bread, and blessed and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, This is my body, given for you; do this for a commemoration of me. And so with the cup, when supper was ended, This cup, he said, is the new testament, in my Blood which is to be shed for you.” (l4) And by bidding the Apostles to do this in memory of Him, He made clear that He wanted it to be forever repeated. This intention of Christ was faithfully carried out by the primitive Church through her adherence to the teaching of the Apostles and through her gatherings to celebrate the Eucharistic Sacrifice. As St. Luke is careful to point out, “They occupied themselves continually with the Apostles’ teaching, their fellowship in the breaking of bread, and the fixed times of prayer.” (l5) The faithful used to derive such spiritual fervor from this practice that it was said of them that “there was one heart and soul in all the company of the believers.” (16)

New Offering of the New Testament

29. Moreover, the Apostle Paul, who faithfully transmitted to us what he had received from the Lord, (17) is clearly speaking of the Eucharistic Sacrifice when he points out that Christians ought not take part in pagan sacrifices, precisely because they have been made partakers of the table of the Lord. “Is not this cup we bless,” he says, “a participation in Christ’s Blood? Is not the Bread we break a participation in Christ’s Body? . . . To drink the Lord’s cup, and yet to drink the cup of evil spirits, to share the Lord’s feast, and to share the feast of evil spirits, is impossible for you.” (18) Foreshadowed by Malachias, (19) this new oblation of the New Testament has always been offered by the Church, in accordance with the teaching of Our Lord and the Apostles, “not only to atone for the sins and punishments and satisfactions of the living faithful and to appeal for their other needs, but also to help those who have died in Christ but have not yet been completely purified.” (20)

Offered Also for the Dead

30. We will pass over the other citations and rest content with recalling the testimony offered by St. Cyril of Jerusalem, who wrote the following memorable words for the neophytes whom he was instructing in the Christian faith: “After the spiritual sacrifice, the un-bloody act of worship, has been completed, we bend over this propitiatory offering and beg God to grant peace to all the Churches, to give harmony to the whole world, to bless our rulers, our soldiers and our companions, to aid the sick and afflicted, and in general to assist all those who stand in need; we all pray for all these intentions and we offer this victim for them . . . and last of all for our deceased holy forefathers and bishops and for all those who have lived among us. For we have a deep conviction that great help will be afforded those souls for whom prayers are offered while this holy and awesome victim is present.” In support of this, this holy Doctor offers the example of a crown made for an emperor in order to win a pardon for some exiles, and he concludes his talk with these words: “In the same fashion, when we offer our prayers to God for the dead, even those who are sinners, we are not just making a crown but instead are offering Christ who was slaughtered for our sins, and thus begging the merciful God to take pity both on them and on ourselves.” (21) St. Augustine attests that this custom of offering the “sacrifice which ransomed us” also for the dead was observed in the Church at Rome, (22) and he mentions at the same time that the universal Church observed this custom as something handed down from the Fathers. (23)

The Universal Priesthood

31. But there is something else that We would like to add that is very helpful in shedding light on the mystery of the Church; We mean the fact that the whole Church plays the role of priest and victim along with Christ, offering the Sacrifice of the Mass and itself completely offered in it. The Fathers of the Church taught this wondrous doctrine. (24) A few years ago Our predecessor of happy memory, Pius XII, explained it. (25) And only recently the Second Vatican Council reiterated it in its Constitution on the Church, in dealing with the people of God. (26) To be sure, the distinction between the universal priesthood and the hierarchical priesthood is something essential and not just a matter of degree, and it has to be maintained in a proper way. (27) Yet We cannot help being filled with an earnest desire to see this teaching explained over and over until it takes deep root in the hearts of the faithful. For it is a most effective means of fostering devotion to the Eucharist, of extolling the dignity of all the faithful, and of spurring them on to reach the heights of sanctity, which means the total and generous offering of oneself to the service of the Divine Majesty.

No Mass is “Private”

32. It is also only fitting for us to recall the conclusion that can be drawn from this about “the public and social nature of each and every Mass.” (28) For each and every Mass is not something private, even if a priest celebrates it privately; instead, it is an act of Christ and of the Church. In offering this sacrifice, the Church learns to offer herself as a sacrifice for all and she applies the unique and infinite redemptive power of the sacrifice of the Cross to the salvation of the whole world. For every Mass that is celebrated is being offered not just for the salvation of certain people, but also for the salvation of the whole world. The conclusion from this is that even though active participation by many faithful is of its very nature particularly fitting when Mass is celebrated, still there is no reason to criticize but rather only to approve a Mass that a priest celebrates privately for a good reason in accordance with the regulations and legitimate traditions of the Church, even when only a server to make the responses is present. For such a Mass brings a rich and abundant treasure of special graces to help the priest himself, the faithful, the whole Church and the whole world toward salvation—and this same abundance of graces is not gained through mere reception of Holy Communion.

33. And so, We recommend from a paternal and solicitous heart that priests, who constitute Our greatest joy and Our crown in the Lord, be mindful of the power they have received from the bishop who ordained them—the power of offering sacrifice to God and of celebrating Mass for the living and for the dead in the name of the Lord. (79) We recommend that they celebrate Mass daily in a worthy and devout fashion, so that they themselves and the rest of the faithful may enjoy the benefits that flow in such abundance from the Sacrifice of the Cross. In doing so, they will also be making a great contribution toward the salvation of mankind.

CHRIST SACRAMENTALLY PRESENT IN THE SACRIFICE OF THE MASS

34. The few things that We have touched upon concerning the Sacrifice of the Mass encourage Us to say something about the Sacrament of the Eucharist, since both Sacrifice and Sacrament pertain to the same mystery and cannot be separated from each other. The Lord is immolated in an unbloody way in the Sacrifice of the Mass and He re-presents the sacrifice of the Cross and applies its salvific power at the moment when he becomes sacramentally present— through the words of consecration—as the spiritual food of the faithful, under the appearances of bread and wine.

Various Ways in Which Christ is Present

35. All of us realize that there is more than one way in which Christ is present in His Church. We want to go into this very joyful subject, which the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy presented briefly, (30) at somewhat greater length. Christ is present in His Church when she prays, since He is the one who “prays for us and prays in us and to whom we pray: He prays for us as our priest, He prays in us as our head, He is prayed to by us as our God” (31); and He is the one who has promised, “Where two or three are gathered together in my name, I am there in the midst of them.” (32) He is present in the Church as she performs her works of mercy, not just because whatever good we do to one of His least brethren we do to Christ Himself, (33)but also because Christ is the one who performs these works through the Church and who continually helps men with His divine love. He is present in the Church as she moves along on her pilgrimage with a longing to reach the portals of eternal life, for He is the one who dwells in our hearts through faith, (34) and who instills charity in them through the Holy Spirit whom He gives to us. (35)

36. In still another very genuine way, He is present in the Church as she preaches, since the Gospel which she proclaims is the word of God, and it is only in the name of Christ, the Incarnate Word of God, and by His authority and with His help that it is preached, so that there might be “one flock resting secure in one shepherd.” (36)

37. He is present in His Church as she rules and governs the People of God, since her sacred power comes from Christ and since Christ, the “Shepherd of Shepherds,” (37) is present in the bishops who exercise that power, in keeping with the promise He made to the Apostles.

38. Moreover, Christ is present in His Church in a still more sublime manner as she offers the Sacrifice of the Mass in His name; He is present in her as she administers the sacraments. On the matter of Christ’s presence in the offering of the Sacrifice of the Mass, We would like very much to call what St. John Chrysostom, overcome with awe, had to say in such accurate and eloquent words: “I wish to add something that is clearly awe-inspiring, but do not be surprised or upset. What is this? It is the same offering, no matter who offers it, be it Peter or Paul. It is the same one that Christ gave to His disciples and the same one that priests now perform: the latter is in no way inferior to the former, for it is not men who sanctify the latter, but He who sanctified the former. For just as the words which God spoke are the same as those that the priest now pronounces, so too the offering is the same.” (38) No one is unaware that the sacraments are the actions of Christ who administers them through men. And so the sacraments are holy in themselves and they pour grace into the soul by the power of Christ, when they touch the body. The Highest Kind of Presence.

These various ways in which Christ is present fill the mind with astonishment and offer the Church a mystery for her contemplation. But there is another way in which Christ is present in His Church, a way that surpasses all the others. It is His presence in the Sacrament of the Eucharist, which is, for this reason, “a more consoling source of devotion, a lovelier object of contemplation and holier in what it contains” (39) than all the other sacraments; for it contains Christ Himself and it is “a kind of consummation of the spiritual life, and in a sense the goal of all the sacraments.” (40)

39. This presence is called “real” not to exclude the idea that the others are “real” too, but rather to indicate presence par excellence, because it is substantial and through it Christ becomes present whole and entire, God and man. (41) And so it would be wrong for anyone to try to explain this manner of presence by dreaming up a so-called “pneumatic” nature of the glorious body of Christ that would be present everywhere; or for anyone to limit it to symbolism, as if this most sacred Sacrament were to consist in nothing more than an efficacious sign “of the spiritual presence of Christ and of His intimate union with the faithful, the members of His Mystical Body.” (42)

The Proper Use of Symbolism

40. It is true that the Fathers and Scholastics had a great deal to say about symbolism in the Eucharist, especially with regard to the unity of the Church. The Council of Trent, in re-stating their doctrine, taught that our Saviour bequeathed the Eucharist to His Church “as a symbol . . . of the unity and charity with which He wished all Christians to be joined among themselves,” “and hence as a symbol of that one Body of which He is the Head.” (43)

41. When Christian literature was still in its infancy, the unknown author of the work called the “Didache or Teaching of the Twelve Apostles” had this to write on the subject: “As far as the Eucharist is concerned, give thanks in this manner: . . . just as this bread had been broken and scattered over the hills and was made one when it was gathered together, so too may your church be gathered into your kingdom from the ends of the earth.” (44)

42. St. Cyprian too, in the course of laying stress on the Church’s unity in opposition to schism, said this: “Finally the Lord’s sacrifices proclaim the unity of Christians who are bound together by a firm and unshakeable charity. For when the Lord calls the bread that has been made from many grains of wheat His Body, He is describing our people whose unity He has sustained; and when He refers to wine pressed from many grapes and berries as His Blood, once again He is speaking of our flock which has been formed by fusing many into one.” (45)

43. But before all of these, St. Paul had written to the Corinthians: “The one bread makes us one body, though we are many in number; the same bread is shared by all.” (46)

Symbolism Inadequate to Express Real Presence

44. While Eucharistic symbolism is well suited to helping us understand the effect that is proper to this Sacrament—the unity of the Mystical Body—still it does not indicate or explain what it is that makes this Sacrament different from all the others. For the constant teaching that the Catholic Church has passed on to her catechumens, the understanding of the Christian people, the doctrine defined by the Council of Trent, the very words that Christ used when He instituted the Most Holy Eucharist, all require us to profess that “the Eucharist is the flesh of Our Savior Jesus Christ which suffered for our sins and which the Father in His loving kindness raised again.” (47) To these words of St. Ignatius, we may well add those which Theodore of Mopsuestia, who is a faithful witness to the faith of the Church on this point, addressed to the people: “The Lord did not say: This is symbol of my body, and this is a symbol of my blood, but rather: This is my body and my blood. He teaches us not to look to the nature of what lies before us and is perceived by the senses, because the giving of thanks and the words spoken over it have changed it into flesh and blood.” (45)

45. The Council of Trent, basing itself on this faith of the Church, “openly and sincerely professes that after the consecration of the bread and wine, Our Lord Jesus Christ, true God and man, is really, truly and substantially contained in the Blessed Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist under the outward appearances of sensible things.” And so Our Savior is present in His humanity not only in His natural manner of existence at the right hand of the Father, but also at the same time in the sacrament of the Eucharist “in a manner of existing that we can hardly express in words but that our minds, illumined by faith, can come to see as possible to God and that we must most firmly believe.” (49)

CHRIST PRESENT IN THE EUCHARIST THROUGH TRANSUBSTANTIATION

46. To avoid any misunderstanding of this type of presence, which goes beyond the laws of nature and constitutes the greatest miracle of its kind, (50) we have to listen with docility to the voice of the teaching and praying Church. Her voice, which constantly echoes the voice of Christ, assures us that the way in which Christ becomes present in this Sacrament is through the conversion of the whole substance of the bread into His body and of the whole substance of the wine into His blood, a unique and truly wonderful conversion that the Catholic Church fittingly and properly calls transubstantiation. (51) As a result of transubstantiation, the species of bread and wine undoubtedly take on a new signification and a new finality, for they are no longer ordinary bread and wine but instead a sign of something sacred and a sign of spiritual food; but they take on this new signification, this new finality, precisely because they contain a new “reality” which we can rightly call ontological. For what now lies beneath the aforementioned species is not what was there before, but something completely different; and not just in the estimation of Church belief but in reality, since once the substance or nature of the bread and wine has been changed into the body and blood of Christ, nothing remains of the bread and the wine except for the species—beneath which Christ is present whole and entire in His physical “reality,” corporeally present, although not in the manner in which bodies are in a place.

Writings of the Fathers

47. This is why the Fathers felt they had a solemn duty to warn the faithful that, in reflecting upon this most sacred Sacrament, they should not pay attention to the senses, which report only the properties of bread and wine, but rather to the words of Christ, which have power great enough to change, transform, “transelementize” the bread and wine into His body and blood. As a matter of fact, as the same Fathers point out on more than one occasion, the power that does this is the same power of Almighty God that created the whole universe out of nothing at the beginning of time.

48. “Instructed as you are in these matters,” says St. Cyril of Jerusalem, at the end of a sermon on the mysteries of the faith, “and filled with an unshakeable faith that what seems to be bread is not bread—though it tastes like it—but rather the Body of Christ; and that what seems to be wine is not wine—even though it too tastes like it—but rather the Blood of Christ . . . draw strength from receiving this bread as spiritual food and your soul will rejoice.” (52)

49. St. John Chrysostom insists upon the same point with these words: “It is not man who makes what is put before him the Body and Blood of Christ, but Christ Himself who was crucified for us. The priest standing there in the place of Christ says these words, but their power and grace are from God. This is my Body, he says, and these words transform what lies before him.” (53)

50. Cyril, the Bishop of Alexandria, is in wonderful harmony with John, the Bishop of Constantinople, when he writes in his commentary on the Gospel of St. Matthew: “He said This is my body and this is my blood in a demonstrative fashion, so that you might not judge that what you see is a mere figure; instead the offerings are truly changed by the hidden power of God Almighty into Christ’s body and blood, which bring us the life-giving and sanctifying power of Christ when we share in them.” (54)

51. Ambrose, the Bishop of Milan, in a clear statement on the Eucharistic conversion, has this to say: “Let us be assured that this is not what nature formed but what the blessing has consecrated; and there is greater power in the blessing and in nature, since nature itself is changed through the blessing.” To confirm the truth of this mystery, he recounts many of the miracles described in the Sacred Scriptures, including Christ’s birth of the Virgin Mary, and then he turns his mind to the work of creation, concluding this way: “Surely the word of Christ, who could make something that did not exist out of nothing, can change things that do exist into something they were not before. For it is no less extraordinary to give new natures to things than it is to change nature.” (55)

Constant Teaching of the Popes and the Councils

52. But this is no time for assembling a long list of evidence. Instead, We would rather recall the firmness of faith and complete unanimity that the Church displayed in opposing Berengarius who gave in to certain difficulties raised by human reasoning and first dared to deny the Eucharistic conversion. More than once she threatened to condemn him unless he retracted. Thus it was that Our predecessor, St. Gregory VII, commanded him to swear to the following oath: “I believe in my heart and openly profess that the bread and wine that are placed on the altar are, through the mystery of the sacred prayer and the words of the Redeemer, substantially changed into the true and proper and lifegiving flesh and blood of Jesus Christ our Lord, and that after the consecration they are the true body of Christ—which was born of the Virgin and which hung on the Cross as an offering for the salvation of the world—and the true blood of Christ—which flowed from His side—and not just as a sign and by reason of the power of the sacrament, but in the very truth and reality of their substance and in what is proper to their nature.” (56)

53. We have a wonderful example of the stability of the Catholic faith in the way in which these words meet with such complete agreement in the constant teaching of the Ecumenical Councils of the Lateran, Constance, Florence and Trent on the mystery of the Eucharistic conversion, whether it be contained in their explanations of the teaching of the Church or in their condemnations of error.

54. After the Council of Trent, Our predecessor, Pius VI, issued a serious warning, on the occasion of the errors of the Synod of Pistoia, that parish priests not neglect to speak of transubstantiation, which is listed among the articles of the faith, in the course of carrying out their office of teaching. (57) Similarly, Our Predecessor of happy memory, Pius XII, recalled the bounds beyond which those who were carrying on subtle discussion of the mystery of transubstantiation might not pass; (58) and We Ourself, at the National Eucharistic Congress that was recently celebrated at Pisa, bore open and solemn witness to the faith of the Church, in fulfillment of Our apostolic duty. (59)

55. Moreover, the Catholic Church has held firm to this belief in the presence of Christ’s Body and Blood in the Eucharist not only in her teaching but in her life as well, since she has at all times paid this great Sacrament the worship known as “latria,” which may be given to God alone. As St. Augustine says: “It was in His flesh that Christ walked among us and it is His flesh that He has given us to eat for our salvation; but no one eats of this flesh without having first adored it . . . and not only do we not sin in thus adoring it, but we would be sinning if we did not do so.” (60)

ON THE WORSHIP OF LATRIA

56. The Catholic Church has always displayed and still displays this latria that ought to be paid to the Sacrament of the Eucharist, both during Mass and outside of it, by taking the greatest possible care of consecrated Hosts, by exposing them to the solemn veneration of the faithful, and by carrying them about in processions to the joy of great numbers of the people.

57. The ancient documents of the Church offer many evidences of this veneration. The bishops of the Church always urged the faithful to take the greatest possible care of the Eucharist that they had in their homes. “The Body of Christ is meant to be eaten by the faithful, not to be treated with irreverence,” is the serious warning of St. Hippolytus. (61)

58. In fact, the faithful regarded themselves as guilty, and rightly so as Origen recalls, if, after they had received the body of the Lord and kept it with all reverence and caution, some part of it were to fall to the ground through negligence. (62)

59. These same bishops were severe in reproving any lack of due reverence that might occur. We have evidence of this from the words of Novatian, whose testimony is trustworthy in this matter; He felt that anybody deserved to be condemned who “came out after Sunday service bringing the Eucharist with him, as was the custom, . . . and carried the holy body of the Lord around with him,” going off to places of amusement instead of going home. (63)

60. In fact, St. Cyril of Alexandria denounced as mad the opinion that the Eucharist was of no use to sanctification if some of it were left over for another day. “For Christ is not altered,” he says, “and His holy body is not changed; instead the power and force and life-giving grace of the blessing remain in it forever.” (64)

61. Nor should we forget that in ancient times the faithful—whether being harassed by violent persecutions or living in solitude out of love for monastic life—nourished themselves even daily on the Eucharist, by receiving Holy Communion from their own hands when there was no priest or deacon present. (65)

62. We are not saying this with any thought of effecting a change in the manner of keeping the Eucharist and of receiving Holy Communion that has been laid down by subsequent ecclesiastical laws still in force; Our intention is that we may rejoice over the faith of the Church which is always one and the same.

Corpus Christi, Another Instance of Latria

63. This faith also gave rise to the feast of Corpus Christi, which was first celebrated in the diocese of Liege—especially through the efforts of the servant of God, Blessed Juliana of Mount Cornelius—and Our predecessor, Urban IV, established for the universal Church. It has also given rise to many forms of Eucharistic devotion that have, through the inspiration of God’s grace, grown with each passing day. Through them the Catholic Church is eagerly striving to pay honor to Christ and to thank Him for such a great gift and to beg His mercy.

EXHORTATION TO FOSTERING EUCHARISTIC DEVOTION

64. And so We beseech you, Venerable Brothers, to take this faith, which means nothing less than maintaining complete fidelity to the words of Christ and the Apostles, and preserve it in its purity and integrity among the people entrusted to your care and vigilance, with all false and pernicious opinions being completely rejected; and We beseech you to foster devotion to the Eucharist, which should be the focal point and goal of all other forms of devotion.

65. May the faithful, thanks to your constant efforts, come to realize and experience more and more that: “he who wants to live can find here a place to live in and the means to live on. Let him approach, let him believe, let him be incorporated so that he may receive life. Let him not shy away from union with the members, let him not be a rotten member that deserves to be cut away, nor a distorted member to be ashamed of: let him be beautiful, let him be fitting, let him be healthy. Let him adhere to the body; let him live for God on God: let him labor now upon earth, so that he may afterwards reign in heaven.” (66)

Daily Mass and Holy Communion

66. It is desirable to have the faithful in large numbers take an active part in the sacrifice of the Mass each and every day and receive the nourishment of Holy Communion with a pure and holy mind and offer fitting thanks to Christ the Lord for such a great gift. They should remember these words: “The desire of Jesus Christ and of the Church to see all the faithful approach the sacred banquet each and every day is based on a wish to have them all united to God through the Sacrament and to have them draw from it the strength to master their passions, to wash away the lesser sins that are committed every day and to prevent the serious sins to which human frailty is subject.” (67) And they should not forget about paying a visit during the day to the Most Blessed Sacrament in the very special place of honor where it is reserved in churches in keeping with the liturgical laws, since this is a proof of gratitude and a pledge of love and a display of the adoration that is owed to Christ the Lord who is present there.

Dignity Bestowed by Eucharist

67. No one can fail to see that the divine Eucharist bestows an incomparable dignity upon the Christian people. For it is not just while the Sacrifice is being offered and the Sacrament is being confected, but also after the Sacrifice has been offered and the Sacrament confected—while the Eucharist is reserved in churches or oratories—that Christ is truly Emmanuel, which means “God with us.” For He is in the midst of us day and night; He dwells in us with the fullness of grace and of truth. (68) He raises the level of morals, fosters virtue, comforts the sorrowful, strengthens the weak and stirs up all those who draw near to Him to imitate Him, so that they may learn from his example to be meek and humble of heart, and to seek not their own interests but those of God. Anyone who has a special devotion to the sacred Eucharist and who tries to repay Christ’s infinite love for us with an eager and unselfish love of his own, will experience and fully understand—and this will bring great delight and benefit to his soul—just how precious is a life hidden with Christ in God (69) and just how worthwhile it is to carry on a conversation with Christ, for there is nothing more consoling here on earth, nothing more efficacious for progress along the paths of holiness.

68. You also realize, Venerable Brothers, that the Eucharist is reserved in churches or oratories to serve as the spiritual center of a religious community or a parish community, indeed of the whole Church and the whole of mankind, since it contains, beneath the veil of the species, Christ the invisible Head of the Church, the Redeemer of the world, the center of all hearts, “by whom all things are and by whom we exist.” (70)

69. Hence it is that devotion to the divine Eucharist exerts a great influence upon the soul in the direction of fostering a “social” love, (71) in which we put the common good ahead of private good, take up the cause of the community, the parish, the universal Church, and extend our charity to the whole world because we know that there are members of Christ everywhere.

A Sign and Cause of Unity

70. Because, Venerable Brothers, the Sacrament of the Eucharist is a sign and cause of the unity of Christ’s Mystical Body, and because it stirs up an active “ecclesial” spirit in those who are more fervent in their Eucharistic devotion, never stop urging your faithful, as they approach the Mystery of the Eucharist, to learn to embrace the Church’s cause as their own, to pray to God without slackening, to offer themselves to God as an acceptable sacrifice for the peace and unity of the Church; so that all the sons of the Church may be united and feel united and there may be no divisions among them but rather unity of mind and intention, as the Apostle commands. (72) May all those who are not yet in perfect communion with the Catholic Church and who glory in the name of Christian despite their separation from her, come as soon as possible to share with us, through the help of God’s grace, in that unity of faith and communion that Christ wanted to be the distinctive mark of His disciples.

A Special Task for Religious

71. This zeal at prayer and at devoting oneself to God for the sake of the unity of the Church is something that religious, both men and women, should regard as very specially their own since they are bound in a special way to adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, and they have, by virtue of the vows they have pronounced, become a kind of crown set around it here on earth.

The Tridentine Decree

72. The Church in the past has felt and still feels that nothing is more ancient and more pleasing than the desire for the unity of all Christians, and We want to express this in the very same words that the Council of Trent used to conclude its decree on the Most Holy Eucharist: “In conclusion, the Council with paternal love admonishes, exhorts, begs and implores ‘through the merciful kindness of our God (73) that each and every Christian may come at last to full agreement in this sign of unity, in this bond of charity, in this symbol of harmony; that they may be mindful of the great dignity and the profound love of Our Lord Jesus Christ, who gave up His precious life as the price of our salvation and who gave us His flesh to eat (74); and that they may believe and adore these sacred mysteries of His body and blood with such firm and unwavering faith, with such devotion and piety and veneration that they will be able to receive that supersubstantial (75) bread often and it will truly be the life of their souls and the unfailing strength of their minds, so that ‘fortified by its vigor,’ (76) they may be able to move on from this wretched earthly pilgrimage to their heavenly home where, without any veil, they will eat the ‘bread of angels’ (77) that they now eat beneath the sacred veils.” (78)

73. May the all-merciful Redeemer, who shortly before His death prayed to the Father that all who were to believe in Him might be one, just as He and the Father are one, (79) deign to hear this most ardent prayer of Ours and of the whole Church as quickly as possible, so that we may all celebrate the Eucharistic Mystery with one voice and one faith, and through sharing in the Body of Christ become one body, (80) joined together by the same bonds that Christ wanted it to have.

A Word to the Eastern Churches

74. We also want to address with fraternal affection those who belong to the venerable Churches of the East, which have had so many glorious Fathers whose testimony to belief in the Eucharist We have been so glad to cite in this present letter of Ours. Our soul is filled with great joy as We contemplate your belief in the Eucharist, which is ours as well, as we listen to the liturgical prayers you use to celebrate this great mystery, as we behold your Eucharistic devotion, as we read your theological works explaining or defending the doctrine of this most sacred Sacrament.

A Final Prayer

75. May the most blessed Virgin Mary, from whom Christ the Lord took the flesh that “is contained, offered, received” (81) in this Sacrament under the appearances of bread and wine, and may all the saints of God and especially those who were more inflamed with ardent devotion toward the divine Eucharist, intercede with the Father of mercies so that this common belief in the Eucharist and devotion to it may give rise among all Christians to a perfect unity of communion that will continue to flourish. Lingering in Our mind are the words of the holy martyr Ignatius warning the Philadelphians against the evil of divisions and schisms, the remedy for which is to be found in the Eucharist. “Strive then,” he says, “to make use of one single thanksgiving. For there is only one flesh of Our Lord Jesus Christ, and only one chalice unto the union of His blood, only one altar, only one bishop . . .” (82)

76. Fortified by the most consoling hope of blessings that will accrue to the whole Church and to the whole world from an increase in devotion to the Eucharist, as a pledge of heavenly blessings We lovingly impart Our apostolic blessings to you, Venerable Brothers, and to the priests, religious and all who are helping you, as well as to all the faithful entrusted to your care.

Given at St. Peter’s, Rome, on the third day of September, the feast of Pope St. Pius X, in the year 1965, the third of Our Pontificate.

PAUL VI

NOTES

LATIN TEXT: Acta Apostolicae Sedis, 57 (1965), 753-74.

ENGLISH TRANSLATION: The Pope Speaks, 10 (Fall, 1965), 309-28.

REFERENCES:

(1) Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, c. 2, n. 47; AAS LVI (1964), 113 [Cf. TPS IX, 325.].

(2) Jn. 6.55.

(3) Cf. Jn 17.23.

(4) Encyclical letter Mirae caritatis: Acta Leonis XIII, XXII (1902-1903) 122.

(5) Homily on Matthew, 82.4; PG 58.743.

(6) Summa Theol. III,(a) q. 75, a. 1, c.

(7) In IV Sent., dist. X, P. I, art. un., qu. I; Opera omnia, tome IV, Ad Claras Aquas (1889), 217.

(8) Jn. 6.61-69.

(9) St. Augustine, Against Julian, VI, 5.11; PL 44.829.

(10) City of God, X, 23; PL 41.300.

(11) Dogmatic Constitution on the Catholic Faith, c. 4.

(12) Cf. Council of Trent, Teaching on the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, c. I.

(13) Cf. Ex 24.8.

(14) Lk 22.19-20; cf. Mt 26.26-28; Mk 14.22-24.

(15) Acts 2.42.

(16) Acts 4.32.

(17) 1 Cor 11.23 ff.

(18) 1 Cor 10.16.

(19) Cf. Mal 1.11.

(20) Council of Trent, Doctrine on the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, c. 2.

(21) Catecheses, 23 [myst. 5]. 8-18; PG 33.1115-1118.

(22) Cf. Confessions IX, 12.32; PL 32.777; cf. ibid. IX 11, 27; PL 32.775.

(23) Cf. Serm 172.2.; PL 38.936; cf. On the care to be taken of the dead, 13, PL 40.593.

(24) Cf. St. Augustine, City ot God, X, 6; PL 42.284.

(25) Cf. Encyclical letter Mediator Dei; AAS XXXIX (1947), 552.

(26) Cf. Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, c. 2, 11; AAS LVII (1965), 15 [Cf. TPS v. 10, p. 366.].

(27) Cf. ibid., c. 2, n. 10; AAS LVII (1965), 14 [Cf. TPS v. 10, p. 365-366.].

(28) Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, c. 1, n. 27; AAS LVI (1964), 107 [Cf. TPS IX, 322.].

(29) Cf. Roman Pontifical.

(30) Cf. c. 1, n. 7; AAS LVI (1964), 100-101.

(31) St. Augustine, On Psalm 85.1: PL 37.1081.

(32) Mt 18.20.

(33) Cf. Mt 25.40.

(34) Cf. Eph 3.17.

(35) Cf. Rom 5.5.

(36) St. Augustine, Against the Letter ot Petiliani, III, 10.11; PL 43.353.

(37) St. Augustine, On Psalm 86.3; PL 37.1102.

(38) Homily on the Second Epistle to Timothy 2.4; PG 62.612.

(39) Aegidius Romanus, Theorems on the Body of Christ, theor. 50 (Venice, 1521), p. 127.

(40) St. Thomas, Summa Theol., IIIa, p. 73, a. 3, c.

(41) Cf. Council of Trent, Decree on the Holy Eucharist, c. 3.

(42) Pius XII, Encyclical letter Humani generis; AAS XLII (1950), 578.

(43) Decree on the Holy Eucharist, Introduction and c. 2.

(44) Didachè, 9.1; F.X. Funk, Patres Apostolici, 1.20.

(45) Epistle to Magnus, 6; PL 3.1139.

(46) 1 Cor 10.17.

(47) St. Ignatius, Epistle to the Smyrnians, 7.1; PG 5.714.

(48) Commentary on Matthew, c. 26; PG 66.714.

(49) Decree on the Most Holy Eucharist, c. 1.

(50) Cf. Encyclical letter Mirae caritatis; Acta Leonis XIII, XXII (1902-1903), 123.

(51) Cf. Council of Trent, Decree on the Most Holy Eucharist, c. 4 and canon 2.

(52) Catecheses, 22.9 [myst. 4] PG 33.1103.

(53) Homily on Judas’ betrayal, 1.6; PG 49.380; cf. Homily on Matthew 82.5; PG 58.744.

(54) On Matthew 26.27; PG 72.451.

(55) On Mysteries 9.50-52; PL 16.422-424.

(56) Mansi, Collectio amplissima Conciliorum, XX, 524D.

(57) Const. Auctorem fidei, August 28, 1794.

(58) Allocution of September 22, 1956, AAS XLVIII (1956), 720 [Cf. TPS III, 281-282.].

(59) AAS LVII (1965), 588-592.

(60) On Psalm 98.9; PL 37.1264.

(61) Apostolic Tradition; ed. Botte, La Tradition Apostolique de St. Hippolyte, Muenster (1963), p. 84.

(62) Fragment on Exodus; PG 12.391.

(63) On Shows; CSEL III,(3) 8.

(64) Epistle to Calosyrius; PG 76.1075.

(65) Cf. Basil, Epistle 93; PG 32.483-486.

(66) St. Augustine, Treatise on John 26.13; PL 35.1613.

(67) Decree of the Sacred Congregation of the Council, December 20, 1905, approved by St. Pius X; AAS XXXVIII (1905), 401.

(68) Cf. Jn 1.14.

(69) Cf. Col 3.3.

(70) 1 Cor 8.6.

(71) Cf. St. Augustine, On the literal interpretation of Genesis XI, 15.20; PL 34.437.

(72) Cf. 1 Cor 1.10.

(73) Lk 1.78.

(74) .Jn 6.48 ff.

(75) Mt 6.11.

(76) 3 Kgs 19.8.

(77) Ps 77.25.

(78) Decree on the Most Holy Eucharist, c. 8.

(79) Cf.Jn 17.20-21.

(80) Cf. 1 Cor 10.17.

(81) C.I.C., canon 801.

(82) Epistle to the Philadelphians 4; PG 5.700.

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A Message from the President

I am writing to announce the formation of the Association of Students at Catholic Colleges.  I hope that you will consider joining the ASCC.  As a member, you will have the option to receive the Cardinal Newman Society’s Higher Education Alert and periodic updates from the ASCC.

The Cardinal Newman Society sponsors the national Association of Students at Catholic Colleges (ASCC) to foster networking and fellowship among students engaged in Church renewal and strengthening the religious identity of Catholic colleges and universities in the United States.

At many Catholic colleges and universities, students are actively engaged in promising efforts to strengthen the religious identity of their institutions and develop a campus life conducive to Christian living.  The Cardinal Newman Society has identified dozens of Catholic campus groups across the country with widely varying approaches: Bible studies, Eucharistic adoration societies, campus newspapers, and community service groups, among others.  The Cardinal Newman Society finds in these groups great promise for the renewal of Catholic campus life.

However, these groups suffer similar problems.  These groups often enjoy vibrant leadership one year but lack such leadership the next.  Student leaders often have little experience or training in club leadership, organizing events, and recruiting members.  Student leaders also lack communication and fellowship with other faithful Catholic students on their campuses and at other institutions.

I believe that a national association is needed to foster communication and fellowship among Catholic student leaders, provide training and resources for successful leadership, and assist students nationwide to replicate successful models of student activity on their own campuses.

I hope you will join us in our efforts to renew Catholic campus life, one student at a time.

God bless!

Thomas P. Harmon
President, Association of Students at Catholic Colleges
Gonzaga University ’03

Mission Statement

The Cardinal Newman Society’s national association of students, the Association of Students at Catholic Colleges (ASCC) is designed to serve students at Catholic colleges and universities interested in preserving and building up the Catholic identity at their schools through a
variety of means.

The organization assists in fostering collaboration among existing groups and individual students at Catholic institutions throughout the country and acts to help students found groups concerned with living the Catholic faith in a way that is faithful to the Magisterium of the Roman Catholic Church and guided by the Apostolic Constitution on Higher Education, Ex Corde Ecclesiae.

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