Archive for year 2017

Write My Essay For Me London

If you discover that it’s challenging to provide the crucial support to your child, you can hire somebody who can make math an intriguing subject for your son or daughter. If you discover that it’s tricky to do it by yourself, seek expert assistance. Math homework help should not feel as a punishment. Homework help with internet math tutoring may give your child the math support required to be successful in math and regain the confidence to be a better learner. So, now you are aware of how excellent homework help with internet math tutoring is possible.

You may accomplish your goal but not be content by it. Additionally, if the only reason you’ve got for achieving an aim is external reward then it’s a control-motivated aim. Your purpose is to provide en environment which gives you the proper stimulation for her special brain. Individuals often set easy goals when they’re fearful they will fail if the set more challenging objectives.

(more…)

Read More

Writing service in c#

Kristen Bell lately authored essential-read essay for Cosmopolitan. Inside it, Kristen Bell highlights the main difference between being kind and being nice. Her husband, Dax Shepard, helped her arrived

essay writing service philadelphia pa

at this realization by providing her a proper dose of honesty. And well, isn’t that what soul mates is all about in the end? The tough-to-say-but-makes-you-better type of honesty. (And not simply rose petals sprinkled on the top from the bed. Although that may be quite nice!)

Her essay drives at something we most likely all have to hear: The only method to true kindness involves hard facts and also the readiness to state these to those we like.

(more…)

Read More

400 cultivars of bananas

Tccl Homework Help

There are many varieties of essays, it isn’t hard to get rid of an eye on all your writing assignments. If you don’t know how to begin your essay or where to search for supporting data, we’ll be pleased to aid you. The way to the best essay is via WritePaperFor.Me. It’s the funniest and best book on the planet.

Do not be hesitant to request a form of paper that you don’t see in our list. Therefore, compiling the comprehensive list is quite hard. If you’re looking for a list of all fruits with pictures, then you’re at the perfect location.

People have been eating bananas for over 15,000 decades. They can always get a banana! For many men and women in the planet, bananas are a great way to find these nutritious substances. There are various kinds of bananas already in the planet, but it isn’t easy to grow a banana with all of these qualities! In the nation of Uganda, individuals call bananas matoke. All these bananas are good for the body.

Research paper writing service reviews

The `Cavendish’ banana has become the most popular banana in the usa and over 400 cultivars of bananas can be found world markets.

Fruits are beautiful present of nature having many varieties and several distinctive tastes. In India, there are lots of kinds of mango fruits available which are also exported to numerous nations custom papers. Since summer is the sole season when mangoes become available in the industry, I eat a whole lot of mangoes. Among all other fruits, it is considered as the king of fruits. Since summer is the principal season when mangoes are readily available in the industry and I fully enjoyed eating lots of mangoes.

It is one of my favorite fruits, as the pulp of the fruit and its juice provide instant energy during the desert-like summer months in India.

Fruits are sold on the market. Some nutritious fruits come at the price of high calories while some contain barely any calories. It is my favored fruit because it’s sweet, appetizing, and healthy. My preferred fruit is watermelon due to its juicy, rich taste.

Besides the list mentioned previously, there are lots of different fruits found on the planet.

Secondly, fruits have attractive colours and can be categorized into various types. These fruits are undoubtedly healthful and nutritious. They are known to be extremely nutritious. Fresh fruits, in their normal form, are also simple to digest, in comparison with nutritional supplements.

Once apples are harvested they’ll spoil very quickly so they need to be eaten immediately. They are available all year round. The main reason is, I believe, that it’s not uncommon to think about apples, generically, in quantities of over one, but not elephants. Dried apples are excellent for snacks.

All citrus fruits are rich sources of vitamin C that is needed by the body to carry out various functions. Numerous fruits are called so as they are developed from several flowers. Finally, this tasty fruit is full of minerals and vitamins. It is thought to be the national fruit of India.

Read More

The Catholic University In Crisis

The Catholic university is one of the most important and influential organs
in the life of the Church.  There, the Church educates her future leaders
in light of the faith and inculcates in them a sense of apostolate and,
hopefully, vocation.  This is where the Church engages the culture
intellectually.  As such, the Catholic university is hugely significant
in the movement to evangelize the culture and transform it into a culture
of life.  As the Holy Father says in Ex Corde Ecclesiae, “Catholic
universities are called to continuous renewal, both as ‘universities’ and
as ‘Catholic.’  For what is at stake is the very meaning of scientific
and technological research, of social life and of culture, but, on an even
more profound level, what is at stake is the very meaning of the human person.”

No one is more concerned with the transmission of the authentic meaning
of the human person than are those gathered at this conference.  It is,
therefore, necessary to attend to the state of the Catholic university today.
Most Catholics know that our Catholic colleges are not what they once
were, but those same Catholics are often unaware of how urgently renewal
is needed.  Without an immediate rededication to the spiritual as well
as the academic development of students, the faith of another generation
is at stake.

Catholic identity discussions today center around the mandatum for theologians
and issues of institutional fidelity to the Church.  But despite their
importance, Catholic identity and the reasons for the mandatum are awfully
abstract ideas, and sometimes the debate and confusion over these abstract
ideas obscure the urgent and pronounced problems that exist in today’s American
Catholic colleges and universities.

The bottom line is that students at Catholic colleges tend to emerge from
those colleges less devout, practicing their faith less, and believing less
that the Church teaches.  For example, support for legalized abortion
among Catholic colleges students increased shockingly from 40.4% to 58.5%.
As part of the powerful secularizing trend in Catholic higher education
since the 1960s, Catholic universities have largely descended into a spirit
of fideism.  That is, while claiming to profess the truths of the Catholic
faith, Catholic universities actively avoid “imposing” that faith on their
own institutional functions.  They have adopted a secular understanding
of the relationship between faith and reason.  To a large extent, they
have preferred a religious studies model of religious education over that
of theology.  Theology is essentially ecclesial in character and takes
the teachings of the Magisterium as its data and first principles, whereas
religious studies is an anthropological study of religion.

Other departments in the Catholic university, especially the natural sciences,
no longer, for the most part, see themselves as having any sort of relationship
to the faith.  Student life policies at many Catholic universities
are indistinguishable from those of secular universities.  Health Centers,
in order to avoid being judgmental refuse to label any reproductive choices
as immoral, including abortion and contraception.  A few colleges even
refer students to Planned Parenthood.  A vanishingly small amount of
Catholic colleges offer programs to encourage chastity among students.

In order to receive government funding, many universities have dissociated
themselves from their religious orders (a move that many legal scholars
now judge was unnecessary and imprudent).  So, most Catholic universities
are owned and governed by a lay board of governors or trustees.  So,
they lack any sort of official ties to the Church.

There have been hopeful signs, though.  University administrators,
for the most part, see that American Catholic higher education has problems
and see the strengthening of Catholic identity as the major question to be
answered in the early part of this century.  The problem is getting them
to define Catholic identity in the same way that the Catholic Church defines
Catholic identity.  So far in the debate about Catholic identity, there
have been only two viewpoints heard: the American Catholic hierarchy and
the faculties and administrations of American Catholic universities.

That discussion has gone something like this: Ex Corde Ecclesiae
is released, followed by an outcry from theologians and university administrations.
The U.S. Catholic bishops listen sympathetically to protests that Ex Corde
violates academic freedom.  Then, they release a draft of norms to implement
Ex Corde seemingly designed to placate the apoplectic Catholic
intelligentsia, but the norms are so vague about who implements Ex Corde
and how it should be implemented that they might as well not have released
anything.  Unsurprisingly, Rome shoots down the norms.  The intelligentsia
become even more disgruntled.  So, the U.S. Bishops release an implementation
document that the Holy See can finally approve.  The Catholic intelligentsia,
especially theologians, cry foul and claim the pope wants to squelch academic
freedom.  So, most bishops in the U.S. decide to placate the schismatic
theologians again and declare that the most controversial part of Ex
Corde
, the requirement that all theologians have a mandate from the
local bishop to teach Catholic theology, will be a private matter between
the bishop and the theologian.  The rest of the document has received
hardly a glance since the norms came out.

Perhaps you may have noticed what is conspicuously missing from the whole
process: any sort of serious appraisal of the interest of the Catholic student.
Both the U.S. bishops and the faculties and administrations of Catholic universities
have altogether ignored this most fundamentally important piece of the puzzle,
acting as if the university is simply a community of scholars with no end
other than their own intellectual edification.  Certainly there has
been no talk of the responsibilities that both the Bishops, as teachers of
the faith, and the universities, as Catholic educational institutions, have
to Catholic students.

If Catholic universities were merely research institutes or think tanks,
the exclusion of the student’s perspective makes sense.  They are not,
though.  Both the proximate and the final end of activity in the university
is the education of students.

The right to academic freedom is a vitally important part of university
life, as the pope declares consistently throughout Ex Corde.
But, because the education of students is the most fundamental end of university
activity, the right of academic freedom must be limited.  The right
to academic freedom may be exercised only so far as the right of the student
to be educated in the truth is respected.  In the case of the theologian,
he or she may exercise the right to academic freedom so far as the right
of the student to be educated in the true teachings of the Church is recognized.
Theology (or religious studies) departments are free to pursue almost whatever
course of study they find fitting as long as, at a Catholic university,
they honestly teach the authentic Catholic faith when they say they are
teaching Catholic theology.  If they find this distasteful, they are
then free to renounce the inaccurate adjective, “Catholic.”  They are
not free to define Catholic faith for themselves, in violation of the Bishop’s
canonical right and duty to teach the faith and the right of the student
to receive instruction in the authentic teachings of the Church at a Catholic
institution.

Of course, there are other compelling arguments against absolute academic
freedom, the best of which are outlined briefly in Ex Corde and fleshed
out significantly in the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith’s Instruction
on the Ecclesial Vocation of the Theologian
and even further unpacked
in Cardinal Ratzinger’s essay, The Nature and Mission of Theology.

The First Buds of a New Springtime at Catholic Universities

It has been frustrating for me and the rest of the members of the advisory
board that has created the Association of Students at Catholic Colleges
that university administrations and faculties are interested in selfishly
protecting their own rights and uninterested in the rights of us faithful
Catholics who, in choosing to attend Catholic colleges, expect an honest
education in the faith, opportunities for genuinely Catholic service to those
in need, and a campus culture that supports the living out of the life of
faith.

In the last few years at Gonzaga University (Spokane, Washington), I have
worked with many of my fellow students and with an administration that is
supportive of the aims of Ex Corde to build the kind of campus culture
of life envisioned by the Holy Father.  We have accomplished an astonishing
amount in a few short years.  There has been a palpable shift in the
campus culture.  Mass attendance is way up, perhaps as much as an astonishing
250%, including and especially daily Mass, there are dozens of Bible studies,
a wide array of new faith-based clubs that have emerged and continue to
emerge, a Catholic fellowship group, weekly Eucharistic adoration, Rosary
groups, the exponential growth of Gonzaga Right to Life, a full RCIA class,
the proposed development of a St. Vincent de Paul Society conference group
on campus, and much more.

This Catholic mini-Renaissance is, I hope, a small prelude and pre-figuration
of what the pope has been calling for when he speaks of the “New Springtime.”
Being fairly isolated in Eastern Washington, we at Gonzaga, at least among
the students, thought that what we were doing at Gonzaga was pretty much
unique.  That changed when I started my job for the summer, an internship
at the Cardinal Newman Society.  As I was familiarizing myself with
the various activities of the Cardinal Newman Society, I kept coming across
small signs of similar renaissances at other Catholic universities.
The most interesting thing to me at that point was that these renaissances
were happening at fairly diverse campuses.  They were happening, for
example, at small places like Benedictine College in Kansas and St. Mary’s
College of Ave Maria Unviersity in Michigan, at medium-sized campuses like
Gonzaga in Washington state and Desales University in Pennsylvania, and at
very large campuses like Notre Dame.

Finally, I came to an article written about three years ago about the revitalization
of Catholic culture at Notre Dame, which, as I understand, is not a small
thing at all.  This article was really the first in-depth account of
a Catholic revitalization at a university I had read, and I was astonished
at how similar many of the initiatives at Notre Dame were to those we were
working on at Gonzaga.  At the same time, there were initiatives at
Notre Dame that we at Gonzaga had not thought about, but which I had a feeling
could be fairly easily tried at Gonzaga.

What struck me about most of these goings-on, though, was that they were
largely student-initiated and student-maintained, with varying degrees of
assistance or hostility from the faculty and administration.  Right
after I read the article about Notre Dame, I got up from my chair, went into
the office of my boss, Patrick Reilly, president of the Cardinal Newman Society,
and said something like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if there were some kind of
organization out there to link and support all of these grass-roots Catholics
activities at these colleges?”

At a small, fairly young organization like the Cardinal Newman Society,
it’s always pretty dangerous to air an idea about a new project.  His
answer was something along the lines of, “Yeah.  Go for it.”  Then,
reading through Ex Corde itself, I found this line that seems to precisely
address the project of the ASCC: “Various associations or movements of spiritual
and apostolic life, especially those developed specifically for students,
can be of great assistance in the developing the pastoral aspects of university
life.” (ECE 42)

The Proper Role of the Student at a Catholic University

A natural question at this point is: What is the proper role of a student
at today’s Catholic universities in light of the legion of problems I have
outlined briefly?  The student goes to school in order to be educated.
At best, the proposition that students have some sort of positive role to
play in the renewal of Catholic higher education seems tenuous.  Students
have neither the teaching authority of the episcopal office nor the authority
that comes from expertise and greater knowledge possessed by university
faculty members and administrators.

Nevertheless, the student has the right to expect certain things when attended
a university calling itself Catholic.  Among others, that student has
the right not to be deprived of the truths of the faith through distortions.
In essence, the Catholic student has the right not to be scandalized.
If such a situation exists, as it very often does, then the student has the
right to petition the Church, as all of the faithful do, and to demand correction
by the university.

Further, the Catholic student necessarily has the right to engage in Christian
apostolate.  Because all the faithful share in the priesthood of Christ
by virtue of their baptism, they also share in the teaching authority of
the Church.  As Dominican Father Michael Sweeney says in his essay reflection
on the importance of the Holy Father’s apostolic exhortation Christifideles
Laici
: “Each Christian has authority to speak for the whole Church in
presenting Christ to the world, and each Christian is called to exercise
authority for the sake and mission of the Church.”  He continues:

Christ has conferred upon you — through baptism and anointing
— the authority to teach the world about Him.  You have the authority
to speak in His name.  But you have also been given the power to do
so.  In other words, when you speak to others about Christ, the Holy
Spirit will move the hearts of others to hear you — exactly, that is, to
the degree that you really do speak with and for the Church.  The result
is that the person will respond, not simply to you, but to Christ speaking
through you.

In other words, the faithful Catholic, including students, teach with authority
when they proclaim Christ while in communion with the Church.

Christifideles Laici is a treasure trove for Catholics.
The Second Vatican Council was much less about saying Mass in the vernacular
than it was, perhaps most significantly among other things, an unprecedented
emphasis on and theological development of lay vocation.  Christifideles
Laici
is the Holy Father’s apostolic exhortation on lay vocation written
in the authentic spirit of Vatican II.  Catholic students benefit from
this wisdom as much as the rest of the faithful.

In Christifideles Laici, the Holy Father defines the vocation
of the lay faithful as being to “seek the Kingdom of God by engaging in
temporal affairs and ordering them according to the plan of God” (CL
9).  In this context, lay Catholic share in Christ’s mission as priest,
prophet and king.  Lay Catholics are to offer themselves as sacrifices
in their daily lives and work, to proclaim Christ, and to spread His kingdom
through the world and through time.  (CL 14)

Put simply, the mission of the Association of Students at Catholic Colleges
is to help Catholic students live their lay vocations at Catholic colleges
and to help make them aware of the power and authority they share in by
virtue of their baptism.  Because that power and authority come from
being in communion with the Church, we also insist that our members be entirely
faithful to the Catholic faith as it comes to us through the Magisterium
of the Church.

The Association Itself

The ASCC’s mission statement reads: “The Cardinal Newman Society’s national
association of students, the Association of Students at Catholic Colleges
(ASCC) is designed to serve students at Catholic colleges and universities
interested in preserving and building up the Catholic identity at their
schools through a variety of means.  The organization assists in fostering
collaboration among existing groups and individual students at Catholic
institutions throughout the country and acts to help students found groups
concerned with living the Catholic faith in a way that is faithful to the
Magisterium of the Roman Catholic Church and guided by the Apostolic Constitution
on Higher Education, Ex Corde Ecclesiae.”

Because of the roughly fifty year process of secularization, especially
intensive in the seventies through the nineties, Catholic universities, for
the most part, fail spectacularly to live up to their institutional commitments
to the Church.  The personnel on the faculties, in the administration,
and on the boards of trustees are largely uninterested for the pope’s call
for a New Evangelization and the creation of the culture of life.
Because of the consequences of tenure among faculty members and the fact
that most universities have dissociated legally and officially from their
religious orders (including Notre Dame), there is simply no way juridically
to force universities to live out their Catholic mission faithfully.
The bishops have, thus far, shown an alarming reluctance to stand up for
the faith scandalized terribly at American Catholic universities.
Instead, the prefer to abandon their obligations to the faithful Catholics
working at those universities and attending them as students in favor of
placating schismatic theologians and university administrators who have,
thus far, shown themselves to be completely unwilling to teach the faith
faithfully.

Because they consider, strangely, the bishops and the governors of the
Church to be, somehow, an outside element in relation to the operation of
the Catholic university, which stands in opposition to the understanding
of the Church, which is that the Catholic university is “born from the heart
of the Church,” (ECE 1), most faculties and administrations have
not made the reforms called for by the Holy Father.  I suspect that
they will not reform if the only impetus to renewal comes from an element
they consider to be “outside.”

This is where the ASCC comes in.  Our strategy is to change the campus
culture first.  Out of that renewed, inspired culture, the students
themselves will demand that their university lives up to its moral and, frankly,
fiduciary responsibility to be Catholic.  So, the ASCC will launch projects
designed to strengthen the Catholic identity and the culture of life on campus.

In Ex Corde, the Holy Father lists four essential characteristics
a Catholic university must have.  These are:
“A Christian inspiration not only of individuals but of the university
community as such; A continuing reflection in the light of the Catholic
faith upon the growing treasury of human knowledge, to which it seeks to
contribute by its own research; Fidelity to the Christian message as it
comes to us though the Church; An institutional commitment to the service
of the people of God and of the human family in their pilgrimage to the transcendent
goal which gives meaning to life.” (ECE 17)  The ASCC hopes to
serve the Church by strengthening the Catholic identity of Her universities,
especially in these four critical areas.

The main foci of the ASCC are to link and support already existing student
initiatives on campus and to help students start initiatives on campus that
help to strengthen the Catholic identity of the school.  I have, therefore,
structured the organization into departments that deal with the types of
clubs found on campuses.  They are:

1.  Pro-life activities: Most Catholic colleges have a pro-life
club on campus.  There are particularly active pro-life clubs worthy
of emulation at schools like Franciscan University at Steubenville and Gonzaga
University.

2.  Prayer and Devotions: This department will promote a variety
of activites, from Eucharistic Adoration, to Rosary groups, to various initiatives
to establish and educate about Catholic devotional practices and the life
of prayer.  One of the most acute regrets of many young Catholics is
that they have not been introduced to the incredible depth and breadth of
Catholic prayer life.  This department will try to promote various
traditional Catholic prayers like the Angelus, the Divine Mercy Chaplet,
the Novena, etc.  Many of the small, consciously orthodox colleges like
Thomas Aquinas College and Ave Maria University feature an exceptional devotional
life.

3.  Evangelism, apologetics, and Catechetics:  The vast
majority of Catholics at Catholic universities around the country are either
badly catechized or not catechized at all.  There is, therefore, a
great need for this sort of activity at college.  So, this department
is concerned with students who want to learn the faith, how to defend it,
and how to transmit it.  There are excellent programs in this vein
at Marquette University and at St. Louis University.

4.  Bible Studies:  This one goes without saying.
Holy Scripture has been and will continue to be an unending source of inspiration
for Christians.  Whatever we can do to promote the study of the Bible,
we will try to do.  I am aware of good Bible Study programs at the
Unviersity of Dallas and at Notre Dame.

5.  Retreats: For many students, a huge part of their spiritual
development at college happens through the retreats program.  These
are usually, but not always, put on by the campus ministry office, led by
university staff, but crewed by students.  As the crew, students have
influence on how the retreat is organized.  Because of the disproportionately
large influence retreats have on students compared to the time spent at the
retreat, it is very important that the student have a well-formed retreat.
This department is dedicated to the dissemination of ideas about what works
and what doesn’t on retreats.  I am aware of excellent retreat programs
at Gonzaga University and at Notre Dame.

6.  Catholic Fellowship:  At many universities, the campus
culture is not conducive to a genuinely Catholic culture.  So, it is
necessary sometimes to create a group specifically for the development of
Catholic fellowship.  The model we will use for this department is
the program I helped developed at Gonzaga University, the Newman-Stein Fellowship.,
which combines elements of most of the other departments.

7.  Student Liturgies:  Frequently, students are given
a large role in the planning and the carrying out of liturgies on campus.
This department will serve those students active in student liturgies.

8.  Service:  Too often service programs at Catholic universities
are divorced form their foundation in the faith.  This department will
seek to assist and create service programs interested in doing the works
of mercy.  Benedictine College and Xavier University (Cincinnati, Ohio)
both have strong Catholic service programs.

9.  Student Publications: Anti-Catholic media bias is not confined
to major press outlets.  It has also crept into many publications at
Catholic universities, including here at Notre Dame.  This department
will work hand in hand with the Cardinal Newman Society’s Campus Media Project
to found and support alternative Catholic newspapers or official student
papers with strong commitments to the faith.  Excellent Catholic newspapers
exist at Boston College and Georgetown University.

10.  Women’s Issues: Among the strongest anti-Catholic forces
at Catholic universities are the Women’s Studies programs, which have, for
the most part, bought into a postmodern, secular view of the woman.
This department is dedicated to helping students interested in the Church’s
beautiful, authentically liberating message about what it means to be a
woman.  Along with the Men’s Issues department, one of the projects
of this department will be the promotion of the Holy Father’s theology of
the body.  This department will also actively promote vocations to
the religious life.

11.  Men’s Issues:  This department will be devoted to
assisting students and student groups interested in promoting and living what
it means to be a Catholic man.  It will assist the Women’s Issues department
as explained and promote vocations to the priesthood and religious life.

12.  Faculty/Administration Relations: As many students have
found, dealing with administrations and faculties, both those that are hostile
and those that are friendly, is a challenging task at best.  This department
focuses ways to work with faculties and administrations.

In addition to the departments of the student association, the ASCC also
has planned several projects to further its mission.  They are:

  • The Student Handbook, which provides an introduction
    to the Cardinal Newman Society, Ex Corde Ecclesiae, and the thought
    of John Henry Cardinal Newman.  It also provides guidance on how to establish
    a club on campus, suggestions for officers, how to write a constitution,
    and a few suggested activities.  It also includes a list of organizations
    with missions friendly to that of the student association which students
    can contact for resources.
  • The Speakers Bureau, which consists of an extensive
    list of speakers who address topics relevant to students at Catholic colleges
    along with contact info, suggested honoraria, and an outline for a speaker’s
    contract.  At present, the speakers list includes over 80 high-profile
    Catholic speakers.
  • The Annual Conference is held upon the conclusion of
    the Cardinal Newman Society’s annual conference, the ASCC’s conference will
    address issues specifically relevant for students.  It will provide a
    basis in theory, nuts and bolts training, and time for fellowship and networking.
    The first conference was held on November 10, 2002, in Washington, D.C.
  • The Web Site will be the depository for information
    accessible by the general public, including a speaker’s list, essays and
    articles dealing with Catholic higher education, links to organizations
    with missions friendly to the goals of the ASCC, and tools for networking
    among students and student organizations, including a bulletin board system,
    a weblog, and a list of various groups at Catholic colleges and universities
    working to renew Catholic culture and their activities.

The Association is still very young.  The theory is in place, but
we still have to hammer out, concretely, we will go about performing our
mission.  Someone once said that the Christian should pray as if everything
depended on God and to work as if everything depended on him or her.
That’s what we plan on doing.  So, please pray for us.  I would
be grateful if you would join me in beseeching the Blessed Mother of Our
Lord for her intercession on behalf of the ASCC.

Hail Mary . . .

Read More

Bishop Thomas Tobin

Without A Doubt

Friday, June 20, 2003

The Eucharist in Ten Sentences

Introduction

1) The Church draws her life from the Eucharist.

2) To contemplate Christ involves being able to recognize him wherever he manifests himself, in his many forms of presence, but above all in the living sacrament of his body and his blood.

3) The liturgical reform inaugurated by the Council has greatly contributed to a more conscious, active and fruitful participation in the Holy Sacrifice of the Altar on the part of the faithful.

4) The Eucharist is too great a gift to tolerate ambiguity and depreciation.

5) The Eucharist spurs us on our journey through history and plants a seed of living hope in our daily commitment to the work before us.

6) The worship of the Eucharist outside of the Mass is of inestimable value for the life of the Church.

7) If the Eucharist is the centre and summit of the Church’s life, it is likewise the centre and summit of priestly ministry.

8) The celebration of the Eucharist cannot be the starting-point for communion; it presupposes that communion already exists, a communion which it seeks to consolidate and bring to perfection.

9) Mary is a “woman of the Eucharist” in her whole life.

10) By giving the Eucharist the prominence it deserves, and by being careful not to diminish any of its dimensions or demands, we show that we are truly conscious of the greatness of this gift.

Introduction:

The problem with documents of the Church is that nobody reads them. At least, most people don’t read them and therefore they don’t have nearly the impact they might otherwise.

I fear that the same fate awaits Pope John Paul’s recent and beautiful Encyclical Letter on the Eucharist, Ecclesia de Eucharistia, in which he highlights the centrality of the Eucharist in the life of the Church, and discusses some very important themes related to the topic. As a public service, then, I’d like to outline the Pope’s Letter in ten selected sentences and offer a brief reflection on each. I do so with the realization that such a summary will be woefully inadequate, but also with the hope that it will encourage you to read the Encyclical in its entirety.

1) The Church draws her life from the Eucharist. (#1)

The Eucharist stands at the heart of the Church, and throughout its history the Divine Sacrament has traveled with the Church, filling it with hope, even in the most difficult of times. As the Pope says later in his letter, “Every commitment to holiness, every activity aimed at carrying out the Church’s mission, every work of pastoral planning, must draw the strength it needs from the Eucharistic mystery.” (#60)

2) To contemplate Christ involves being able to recognize him wherever he manifests himself, in his many forms of presence, but above all in the living sacrament of his body and his blood. (#6)

Christ is present in many ways when the liturgy is celebrated – in the Word, in the assembly, and in the priest, for example. But the presence of Christ in the Eucharist is very special, is called “real” – not because the other means of presence are not real, but because it is a presence in the fullest sense: a substantial, abiding presence in which Jesus Christ the Son of God is wholly present.

3) The liturgical reform inaugurated by the Council has greatly contributed to a more conscious, active and fruitful participation in the Holy Sacrifice of the Altar on the part of the faithful. (#10)

Full and active participation continues to be the ultimate goal of the liturgical renewal. At the same time, however, liturgical renewal involves a great deal more than exterior changes of language and posture. It calls for an authentic interior renewal that helps us receive worthily all the blessings and graces offered by the sacred liturgy.

4) The Eucharist is too great a gift to tolerate ambiguity and depreciation. (#10)

The Pope talks about the “shadows” that have also accompanied the liturgical renewal of recent years. These include the disappearance of Eucharistic adoration in some places; confusion over sound faith and Catholic doctrine about the Eucharist; a “reductive” interpretation of the Eucharist that strips it of its sacrificial meaning; and unhealthy ecumenical practices.

5) The Eucharist spurs us on our journey through history and plants a seed of living hope in our daily commitment to the work before us. (#20)

Devotion to the Eucharist is much more than a personal spiritual exercise. The Eucharist has profound apostolic implications that lead us to evangelization and service. We cannot worthily receive the Body of Christ and at the same time neglect the needs of his brothers and sisters. The celebration of the Eucharist “increases, rather than lessens, our sense of responsibility for the world today,” the Pope insists.

6) The worship of the Eucharist outside of the Mass is of inestimable value for the life of the Church. (#25)

Eucharistic adoration is strictly linked to the Eucharistic Sacrifice, the Pope reminds us. He urges pastors to encourage Eucharistic exposition and adoration in their parishes, even by their personal example. And he quotes Saint Alphonsus Liguori who wrote: “Of all devotions, that of adoring Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament is the greatest after the sacraments, the one dearest to God and the one most helpful to us.”

7) If the Eucharist is the centre and summit of the Church’s life, it is likewise the centre and summit of priestly ministry. (#31)

Throughout the Encyclical, the Holy Father reminds us of the intrinsic connection between the Eucharist and the Ministerial Priesthood. He points out that a parish always “requires the presence of a presbyter who alone is qualified to offer the Eucharist.” (#32) And the Eucharist is essential to the priest himself. Without it, priests run a very real risk of losing their spiritual focus. And he emphasizes that priests should celebrate the Eucharist daily, “for even if the faithful are unable to be present, it is an act of Christ and the Church.”

8) The celebration of the Eucharist cannot be the starting-point for communion; it presupposes that communion already exists, a communion which it seeks to consolidate and bring to perfection. (#35)

Here the Pope teaches that the Eucharist always presumes a “bond of communion” that is both invisible and visible. The invisible bond refers to the spiritual, and it is for that reason that only those who are in the state of grace are disposed to receive the Eucharist. The visible bond refers to the structure of the Church. Therefore, only those who are “fully incorporated into the Church” are permitted to receive the Eucharist. In simple terms, to receive Holy Communion, an individual must be a Catholic, and must be free of grave sin!

9) Mary is a “woman of the Eucharist” in her whole life. (#53)

At first glance the Scriptures are silent about the relationship between Mary and the Eucharist, the Pope acknowledges. But everything about Mary’s life relates her to the reality of the Eucharist. In the mystery of the Incarnation, Mary was the first to welcome the Body of Christ. Her Fiat is a prelude to the Amen every Catholic says in receiving Holy Communion. In bearing the Son of God in her womb, Mary became the first tabernacle. In witnessing her Son’s sacrifice on Calvary, Mary experienced the sacrificial meaning of the Eucharist. And is there any doubt that Mary participated with the first disciples in the “Breaking of the Bread?”

10) By giving the Eucharist the prominence it deserves, and by being careful not to diminish any of its dimensions or demands, we show that we are truly conscious of the greatness of this gift. (#61)

An authentic appreciation of the Eucharist requires us always to preserve all the dimensions of the Eucharist — sacrifice, sacramental presence and banquet. And along with maintaining the essential doctrinal elements, we should be conscious of the personal blessing it is for us! “In the humble signs of bread and wine, changed into his body and blood, Christ walks beside us as our strength and our food for the journey, and he enables us to become, for everyone, witnesses of hope.” (#62).

With that, the Pope concludes his wonderful Encyclical on the Eucharist. His letter is a stirring reminder that the Eucharist is the finest gift God has given us, a gift always to be treasured, loved and lived!

Read Pope John Paul II’s

Ecclesia de Eucharistia.

Used with Permission from the Diocese of Youngstown, OH.

Read More

ASCC Speakers List: The Church and the World

The Church in America

“The Catholic Experience and the American Experience” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“A Catholic Reading of the American Enterprise” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Church in America” By Fr. C. John McCloskey, Director of the Catholic Information Center, Washington, D.C.

Culture and the Church

“Catholicism and Culture” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“Christian Humanism” by Virgil Nemoianu, William J. Byron Distinguished Professor of Literature and Ordinary Professor of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America and Vice-President of the International Comparative Literature Association

“Christianity and Culture” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Concept of Christian Civilization” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Culture”, by Raymond Arroyo: EWTN, Host of Life on the Rock

“Is the Catholic Church the Enemy of Intellectual Progress?” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“The Kingdom Come on Earth as it is in Heaven: the Place of the Family in Creation” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Maturity of Christian Culture: Some Reflections on the Views of Christopher Dawson” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Power of Hollywood” by L. Brent Bozell, Founder and President of the Media Research Center and the Parents Television Council

General Topics in Religion and Culture:

Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

Deal Hudson, Publisher and Editor of Crisis Magazine

The Contemporary Church

Any Contemporary issue in the Church: Raymond Arroyo: EWTN, Host of Life on the Rock

“The Church in the Modern World” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Current Crisis in the Catholic Church” by Kenneth Whitehead, United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Postsecondary Education (retired)

“CUF: Past, Present, and Future” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“Dissent” by John Mallon, Contributing Editor of Inside the Vatican Magazine

“The Fully Catholic Response to the Scandals Currently Rocking the Catholic Church” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“The Future of Religious Freedom Internationally” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Humanae Vitae and Conscience” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“Of Miters and Men: The Mission of Bishops in the Third Millennium” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“The Priesthood and the Laity in the Domestic Church” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“The Real Cause of the Crisis: And What We Can Do” by Fr. Joseph Fessio, S.J., Editor at Ignatius Press and Chancellor of Ave Maria University

“Religious Freedom Worldwide” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Spirituality in the Modern World” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Strengthening Catholicism in America” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Tertio Millenion Adveniente: The Church in the Twenty-First Century” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“What’s Really Wrong in Today’s Church: A Catholic Layman’s View” by Joseph Hagan, President Emeritus of Assumption College, Professor-At-Large at John Cabot University, and Gentleman-in-Waiting to Pope John Paul II

“The Worldwide Persecution of Christians” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Women and the Church” by independent scholar Catherine Brown Tkacz

Ecumenism/Other Religions

“The Ecumenism of John Paul II” by Kenneth Whitehead, United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Postsecondary Education (retired)

“Evangelicals and Catholics” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“Indestructible Islam” by Jude P. Dougherty, Dean Emeritus of the School of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America

“Understanding Radical Islam” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

Feminism

“Catholic Feminism” Margaret Monahan Hogan, Chair of the Philosophy Department at King’s College, President of the Center for Academic Integrity at Duke University, and Fellow at the Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture

“Fallacies of Catholic Feminism” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“The Feminist Case Against Abortion” by Serrin Foster, president of Feminists for Life

“Motherhood at the Heart of the New Feminism: A Vocation of Love and Service” by Mary Cunningham Agee: The Nurturing Network, President and Founder; Culture of Life Foundation and Institute, Vice Chairman

“Refuse to Choose: Reclaiming Feminism” by Sally A. Winn, Vice President of Feminists for Life

“Women and the Church” by independent scholar Catherine Brown Tkacz

“Women and the Church” by Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Eléonore Raoul Professor of the Humanities and Professor of History

“Women in the Early Church” by independent scholar Catherine Brown Tkacz

“The ‘New Feminism’” by Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Eléonore Raoul Professor of the Humanities and Professor of History

The Media

“Catholic Journalism” by Joseph Bottum: The Weekly Standard, Books and Arts Editor

“The Church and the Media” by Russell Shaw, Author, Editor, Journalist

“Evangelization Through the Media” by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“Media Bias” by L. Brent Bozell, Founder and President of the Media Research Center and the Parents Television Council

“The Media, Particularly its Effects on Us” by Raymond Arroyo: EWTN, Host of Life on the Rock

“The Media’s Impact” by L. Brent Bozell, Founder and President of the Media Research Center and the Parents Television Council

“Understanding the Media” by Connaught Marshner, President of the American Catholic Council

“Vatican II and the Press” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

Secularism

“The Need to Reunderstand What We Mean by the Term ŒSecular‚” “by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

“The Rise of Secularism” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

“The Secular City” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Secularism” by Charles E. Rice, Professor Emeritus of Law at the University of Notre Dame School of Law and Visiting Professor at the Ave Maria University School of Law

General Topics

“Come, Follow Me” (personal testimony) by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“Discrimination Against Traditional Religious Believers in the Academy” by Candace De Russy, Trustee at the State University of New York

“The Future of the Papacy” by Russell Shaw, Author, Editor, Journalist

“Liturgy” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“Salvation: Participating in the Divine Nature” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Where Are You with God? by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

Read More

ASCC Speakers List: Catholic Thought

The Arts and the Church

“The Arts” by Raymond Arroyo, EWTN, Host of Life on the Rock

“The Arts and the Church” by Leonardo Defilippis, Founder of St. Luke Productions

“Film, Comedy, and Christian Humanism: Whit Stillman” ” by Mark C. Henrie, Senior Editor at the Intercollegiate Studies Institute

“Gothic Architecture and Scholasticism” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Key to the Brescia Casket: Typology and the Early Christian Imagination” by independent scholar Catherine Brown Tkacz

“Typology” by independent scholar Catherine Brown Tkacz

Catholic Literature

“Catholic Literature” by Joseph Bottum: The Weekly Standard, Books and Arts Editor

“The Christian Gifts of J.R.R. Tolkien” by Bradley Birzer Assistant Professor of History at Hillsdale College and Senior Fellow at the Center for the American Idea in Houston

“Dante’s Divine Comedy: Classical Catholic Poetry” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Dante’s Political Vision” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Dante’s Use of Thomistic Thought in the Divine Comedy” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Literature and Religion” by Virgil Nemoianu, William J. Byron Distinguished Professor of Literature and Ordinary Professor of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America and Vice-President of the International Comparative Literature Association

“Literature and the Sacramental Imagination” by C.N. “Sue” Abromaitis, Loyola College in Maryland, Professor of English

“Nature and Grace in Dante’s Purgatorio” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Two Percies” by Peter Augustine Lawler, Dana Professor of Government at Berry College

“Writing Novels with a Catholic Perspective” by Bud Macfarlane, Jr., MI, Founder and Executive Director of the Mary Foundation, St. Jude Media, CatholiCity.com, and Founder of the Colebrook Society

Catholic Social Teaching

“Catholic Social Teaching in Business” by Jean Francois Orsini, President of the St. Antoninus Institute for Catholic Education in Business

“Catholic Social Teaching and the Law” by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

“The Development of Papal Social Teaching: From Leo XIII to John Paul II” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Human Rights and Human Responsibilities according to the Church’s social teachings” by, Fr. Robert Araujo S.J.: Gonzaga University School of Law, Professor of Law

“Immigration” by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

“Introduction to Catholic Social Thought” by Mark C. Henrie, Senior Editor at the Intercollegiate Studies Institute

“Papal Social Teaching in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Papal Teaching on the Family, the State, and the Social Question” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“The Philosophical Underpinnings of Catholic Social Teaching: Natural Law and Personalism” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“What Does Catholic Social Doctrine Have to Teach American Liberalism?” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

Service

“Practical Idealism: Compassion in Action” by Mary Cunningham Agee: The Nurturing Network, President and Founder; Culture of Life Foundation and Institute, Vice Chairman

Catholic Universities/Catholic Education

“Academic Freedom and Catholic Identity at Catholic Universities” by David DeWolf, Professor of Law at Gonzaga University School of Law

“The Basic Principles of Jesuit Education” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“A Brief History of How and Why the Jesuits Moved into the Apostolate of Education” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“A Basic Introduction to the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius and their Foundational Role in Jesuit Education” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“Cardinal Newman” by Don Briel, Koch Chair in Catholic Studies at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas, MN.

“Catholic Campus Life” by Mary Beth Bonacci, Real Love Productions

“Campus Culture: Challenges and Hopes” by Fr. William Watson, S.J., Vice President for Mission at Gonzaga University

“Catholic High Schools” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Catholic Identity on a Catholic Campus” by Larry Chapp, Associate Professor of Theology at DeSales University

“The Catholic Law School” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Catholic Studies” by Don Briel, Koch Chair in Catholic Studies at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas, MN.

“Catholic Universities” by Fr. David O‚Connell, CM, JCD, President of the Catholic University of America

“The Catholic University Situation” by Kenneth Whitehead, United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Postsecondary Education (retired)

“Catholicism and the Liberal Model of the University in America” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Christianity and Education Today” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Education, Truth, and the Catholic University” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Ex Corde Ecclesiae” by Fr. David O‚Connell, CM, JCD, President of the Catholic University of America

“Ex Corde Ecclesiae: The Beginning, the Vision, The Reality” by Joseph Hagan, President Emeritus of Assumption College, Professor-At-Large at John Cabot University, and Gentleman-in-Waiting to Pope John Paul II

“Faith and Justice in Catholic Universities” by Fr. William Watson, S.J., Vice President for Mission at Gonzaga University

“The History of Catholic Higher Education in the United States” by Philip Gleason, Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Notre Dame

“The History and Nature of Catholic Education” by Don Briel, Koch Chair in Catholic Studies at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas, MN.

“How to Be a Campus Radical” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Jesuit Education in the United States One Hundred Years Ago” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“Maritain and the Idea of a Catholic University” by Gavin T. Colver, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Assumption College

“The Medieval Catholic University” by Michael Tkacz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University

“My Twenty Years as President of a Catholic College” by Joseph Hagan, President Emeritus of Assumption College, Professor-At-Large at John Cabot University, and Gentleman-in-Waiting to Pope John Paul II

“Newman and Catholic Higher Education” by Don Briel, Koch Chair in Catholic Studies at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas, MN.

“The Origins of Christian Education” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Radical Hope on Campus” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“What Happened to the Catholic University” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

Topics in Catholic Catholic/Catholic Education by Fr. C. John McCloskey, Director of the Catholic Information Center, Washington, D.C.

Education (general)

“The Campus War Against Faith” by Candace De Russy, Trustee at the State University of New York

“The Crisis of Western Education” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Current State of American Higher Education” by Joseph Hagan, President Emeritus of Assumption College, Professor-At-Large at John Cabot University, and Gentleman-in-Waiting to Pope John Paul II

“Deconstructing the University” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Discrimination Against Traditional Religious Believers in the Academy” by Candace De Russy, Trustee at the State University of New York

“Liberal Education” by Phillip Goggans, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Seattle Pacific University

“The Love of Learning and the Desire for God” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Moral Imagination, the Economy of Grace, and the Purpose of Education in the Western Tradition” by Bradley Birzer Assistant Professor of History at Hillsdale College and Senior Fellow at the Center for the American Idea in Houston

“Objective Truth and Subjective Education” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

“Reform and Reformers in Higher Education” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“The University as Community” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The University and Revolution: The 1960s Agenda for American Higher Education” by Rear Admiral (ret.) Michael Ratliff, Vice President of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute

Topics in the Philosophy of Education by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“Why Go to College?” ” by Mark C. Henrie, Senior Editor at the Intercollegiate Studies Institute

History

“American Catholicism before the Second Vatican Council” by Philip Gleason, Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Notre Dame

“American Catholic History in General” by Philip Gleason, Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Notre Dame

“Ancient Christianity and Us: The Once and Future Church” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“A Brief History of How and Why the Jesuits Moved into the Apostolate of Education” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“The Catholic Church and Immigration to the United States” by Philip Gleason, Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Notre Dame

“The Chinese Rites Controversy” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“Christian Philosophy, Christian History: Parallel Ideas” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Christopher Dawson and a Return to Christendom” by Bradley Birzer Assistant Professor of History at Hillsdale College and Senior Fellow at the Center for the American Idea in Houston

“Choruses from the Ideologues, Fields of Martyrs, and Realities of Hope”(how history will save us from the ideologues) by Bradley Birzer Assistant Professor of History at Hillsdale College and Senior Fellow at the Center for the American Idea in Houston

“Church and State in Historical Perspective” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Dechristianization of Europe” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The History of Catholic Higher Education in the United States” by Philip Gleason, Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Notre Dame

“A History of the Marian Sodalities and how they were used to implement Jesuit thought and fuller participation in the sacramental life of the Church” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“The History of Religious Freedom” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“History and the Theology of History” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Important Trends in Pre-Vatican II Piety” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“Jesuit Education in the United States One Hundred Years Ago” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“Law and History of Abortion” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Knocking Down the Myths of Catholic History” by Harry Crocker, author of Triumph: The Power and the Glory of the Catholic Church

“The Medieval Catholic University” by Michael Tkacz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University

“Medieval Irish History” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Men of Vatican II” by Fr. Joseph Fessio, S.J., Editor at Ignatius Press and Chancellor of Ave Maria University

“The Origins of Christian Education” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Origins of the Christian View of History” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Origins of Christian Monasticism” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Sex in the Middle Ages” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

Just War

“Are U.S. Military Plans Consistent with Just War?” by Rear Admiral (ret.) Michael Ratliff, Vice President of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute

“The Catholic Tradition on Just War” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“Christianity, War, and America” by Thomas West, Professor of Politics at the University of Dallas and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Just War: Its Condition, Our Current Situation, and Why it Matters” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“The Just War Tradition” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Peace, War, and the Common Good” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“War and Peace” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

Law and Religion

“Canon Law” by Fr. David O’Connell, CM, JCD, President of the Catholic University of America

“Catholic Social Teaching and the Law” by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

“Catholic Perspectives on American Law” by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

“Church and State in Historical Perspective” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Law and History of Abortion” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Moral Anthropology and American Law” by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

“The Relation Between Christian Anthropology and the Law” by Richard Garnett, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Notre Dame School of Law

“Prayer and the Supreme Court” by Charles E. Rice, Professor Emeritus of Law at the University of Notre Dame School of Law and Visiting Professor at the Ave Maria University School of Law

“Separating Church and State” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Supreme Court and the Establishment Clause” by Richard Garnett, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Notre Dame School of Law

“The Supreme Court and the Establishment Clause” by Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Understanding Church and State” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Vouchers” by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

Topics in Church and State Issues by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

Natural Law

“Aquinas‚ Moral Theory: Law, Grace, and Virtue” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Censorship and Natural Law” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Freedom, Providence, and the Natural Law” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Medical Ethics, Reproductive Technology, and the Natural Law” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Natural Law” by Charles E. Rice, Professor Emeritus of Law at the University of Notre Dame School of Law and Visiting Professor at the Ave Maria University School of Law

“Natural Law” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Natural Law” by J. Budziszewski, Associate Professor of Government and Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin

“Natural Law” by Michael Tkacz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University

“Natural Law” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Natural Law Arguments Against Contraception” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“Natural Law and the Bible” by J. Budziszewski, Associate Professor of Government and Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin

“Natural Law Ethics” by Phillip Goggans, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Seattle Pacific University

“The Natural Law: Its History, Its Content, and Its Applications” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Natural Law, John Courtney Murray, and the Emergence of an Abortion Culture” by Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“The Philosophical Underpinnings of Catholic Social Teaching: Natural Law and Personalism” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

Philosophy and the Church

“21st Century Thomism” by Peter Augustine Lawler, Dana Professor of Government at Berry College

“The Analogy of Being from Aquinas to Calvin” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Catholic Philosophy” by Joseph Bottum: The Weekly Standard, Books and Arts Editor

“Christian Philosophy, Christian History: Parallel Ideas” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Faith and Reason” by Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Eléonore Raoul Professor of the Humanities and Professor of History

“Faith and Reason” by Michael Tkacz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University

“Fideism” by Michael Tkacz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University

“How to Argue for God’s Existence” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“Metaphysics and Theology” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Natural Teleology, Form, and Contemporary Positivist Science” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Nature from Aristotle to Ambrose” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Philosophical background to Pope John Paul II’s Personalist Anthropology & Moral Thought” by Jorge Garcia, Professor of Philosophy at Boston College

“Philosophy of Religion” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“Philosophy of Science” by Michael Tkacz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University

“Reason and Revelation in Aquinas and Calvin” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Relevance of Thomism Today” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“Theology: Queen of the Sciences” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Thomism and Philosophy in the Catholic Tradition” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

The Problem of Evil

“The Problem of Evil” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“Why Does and All-Loving God Allow Suffering?” by Camille Di Blasi, President of the Center for Life Principles

Politics

“Anti-Family Activities at the U.N.” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“The Attacks on the Holy See at the United Nations” by Austin Ruse, President of the Catholic Family and Human Rights Institute

“The Catholic Vote” by Kellyanne Fitzpatrick Conway, President of the Polling Company

“Christian Persecution (in various countries, incl. China, Sudan)” by Nina Shea, Director of the Center for Religious Freedom at Freedom House and Commissioner of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom

“Christian Political Thought” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Christianity and American Politics” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute”Church and State in Historical Perspective” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The City in Christian Thought” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Concept of Christian Civilization” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Dante’s Political Vision” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Francesco de Vitoria and Pre-Enlightenment Human Rights Politics” by John Evans, Professor of English at Arizona State University

“Free Speech” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“The Future of Religious Freedom Internationally” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“The King’s Good Servants, But God’s First: The Mission of Catholic Politicians” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“Papal Teaching on the Family, the State, and the Social Question” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Principles of a Good Political Order” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Reason and Revelation in the American Founding” by Thomas West, Professor of Politics at the University of Dallas and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Religious Freedom Worldwide” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

“Separating Church and State” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Socialist Man: An Intellectual Profile” by Jude P. Dougherty, Dean Emeritus of the School of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America

“Truth, Authority, and Pluralism” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The U.N.’s Threat to Life, Faith, and Family” by Austin Ruse, President of the Catholic Family and Human Rights Institute

“United Nations Social Policy” by Austin Ruse, President of the Catholic Family and Human Rights Institute

“U.S. Policy on Religious Freedom” by Nina Shea, Director of the Center for Religious Freedom at Freedom House and Commissioner of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom

“What Does Catholic Social Doctrine Have to Teach American Liberalism?” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“The Worldwide Persecution of Christians” by Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom of Freedom House and Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute

Topics in Politics

Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

Deal Hudson, Editor and Publisher of Crisis Magazine

Religious Freedom/Freedom of Conscience

“The Kinds of Pluralism and Their Effects on Religious Freedom” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

“The Protection of the Religious and Conscientious Beliefs of Health Care Professionals” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

Globalization

“Globalization” by Fr. Robert Araujo S.J.: Gonzaga University School of Law, Professor of Law

Read More

ASCC Speakers List: Faith and Theology

Apologetics/Evangelization/Catechetics

“Apologetics on the Controversial Issues in Catholicism” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“Being a Light for Christ” by Mary-Louise Kurey, Motivational Speaker, Author, Professional Singer, and Miss America Finalist

“By What Authority: An Evangelical Discovers Catholic Tradition” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Cultural Apologetics: How to Speak to Secular Neighbors about Controversial Moral and Religious Topics” by J. Budziszewski, Associate Professor of Government and Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin

“The Early Church Was the Catholic Church” by Kenneth Whitehead, United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Postsecondary Education (retired)

“Evangelization Through Friendship” by Bud Macfarlane, Jr., MI, Founder and Executive Director of the Mary Foundation, St. Jude Media, CatholiCity.com, and Founder of the Colebrook Society

“Evangelization Through the Media” by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“Friendship Evangelism” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“How Does a Catholic Explain Bad Popes, the Crusades, the Inquisition, and Burning Heretics” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Incarnational Evangelism” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Indulgences: the World’s Most Misunderstood Spiritual Gifts” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Infallibility Doesn’t Mean Never Having to Say You’re Sorry” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Knocking Down the Myths of Catholic History” by Harry Crocker, author of Triumph: The Power and the Glory of the Catholic Church

“Listening Evangelism” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Making Connections: Being a Lay Witness in a Postmodern Culture” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“The Pius XII Controversy” by Kenneth Whitehead, United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Postsecondary Education (retired)

“The Significance of the Petrine See in Early Christianity” By Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“This is My Body: An Evangelical Discovers the Real Presence” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“What’s So Great about the Catholic Church” by Harry Crocker, author of Triumph: The Power and the Glory of the Catholic Church

“Why Be a Catholic?” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

New Evangelization

“Embracing the Promise of a New Catholic Springtime” by Mary Cunningham Agee, The Nurturing Network, President and Founder; Culture of Life Foundation and Institute, Vice Chairman

“Opus Dei” By Fr. C. John McCloskey, Director of the Catholic Information Center, Washington, D.C.

Speakers in Apologetics/Catechetics/Evangelism:

Fr. C. John McCloskey, Director of the Catholic Information Center, Washington, D.C.

Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

Curtis Martin, President of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students

Conversion

“Augustine’s Confessions: Philosophical Insights Crucial to His Conversion” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J.

“Conversion” by Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Eléonore Raoul Professor of the Humanities and Professor of History

“How I Got This Way: Confessions of a Double-Jump Convert” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

Doctrine

“Authority in the Church” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Aquinas on Development of Doctrine” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“The Foundation: The Four Marks of the Church” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

Lectures on the sections of the Catechism by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

“The Basics of Christian Doctrine” by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

“Jacque Maritain on the Church of Christ” by Jude P. Dougherty, Dean Emeritus of the School of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America

“Mediation of Christ’s Authority” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Usury and Lending at Interest in the Catholic Tradition . . . Then and Now” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“What is the Church?” by Michael Dauphinais, Professor of Theology and Academic Dean at Ave Maria University

“Why Does Jesus Make a Difference Jesus Present in His Church” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

The Laity

“Calling All Catholics: The Role of the Laity Today” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“Care and Feeding of the Lay Catholic Apostolate” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Making Connections: Being a Lay Witness in a Postmodern Culture” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“The Priesthood and the Laity in the Domestic Church” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“The Role of the Catholic Laity” by Russell Shaw, Author, Editor, Journalist

Moral Theology

“Aquinas‚ Moral Theory: Law, Grace, and Virtue” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Catholic Moral Thought” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“The Catholic Moral Tradition” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“Does Everyone Establish His or Her Own Moral Truth?” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“The Foundations of Catholic Moral Theology” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“The Good News About Catholic Sexual Morality” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“Is Anything that Two People Consented to Do Together All Right because they Consented to Do It?” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“Is There Any Truth About Morality” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“The Moral Life and Christ” by Michael Dauphinais, Professor of Theology and Academic Dean at Ave Maria University

“Usury and Lending at Interest in the Catholic Tradition . . . Then and Now” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Veritatis Splendor and Bioethics” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Veritatis Splendor and the Catholic Moral Life” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Veritatis Splendor and Humanae Vitae” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

Prayer/Sacraments

“Adding a SPARK to Your Prayer Life” by Mary-Louise Kurey, Motivational Speaker, Author, Professional Singer, and Miss America Finalist

“A Basic Introduction to the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius and their Foundational Role in Jesuit Education” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“The Benedictine Way of Life” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Christ in You: His Real Presence Makes a Real Difference” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“The Eucharist: The Source of All Your Happiness: by Mary-Louise Kurey, Motivational Speaker, Author, Professional Singer, and Miss America Finalist

“Family Prayer” by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

“Faith Development in College Students” by Fr. William Watson, S.J., Vice President for Mission at Gonzaga University

“Indulgences: The World’s Most Misunderstood Spiritual Gifts” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“How to Make an Examination of Conscience: The Tradition of St. Ignatius” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Living Out a Pro-Life Spirituality within the Family” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“The Life of Prayer” by Michael Dauphinais, Professor of Theology and Academic Dean at Ave Maria University

“Praying with the Scripture” by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

“Spirituality in the Contemporary World” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Theology, Spirituality, and Biblical Exegesis of the Fathers of the Church” by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

Topics in Prayer/Sacraments by Curtis Martin, President of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students

Saints/Great Catholics

“The Active and Contemplative Lives in the Thought of Aquinas” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“An Evening with Chesterton,” One-Man Play by John C. “Chuck” Chalberg

“Aquinas‚ Moral Theory: Law, Grace, and Virtue” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Aquinas on Development of Doctrine” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Augustine’s Anthropology” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Augustine’s Confessions: Philosophical Insights Crucial to His Conversion” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“A Basic Introduction to the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius and their Foundational Role in Jesuit Education” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“Cardinal Newman” by Don Briel, Koch Chair in Catholic Studies at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas, MN.

“Chesterton and Science” by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“The Christian Gifts of J.R.R. Tolkien” by Bradley Birzer Assistant Professor of History at Hillsdale College and Senior Fellow at the Center for the American Idea in Houston

“Church Fathers Today” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“The Confessions of St. Augustine” a One-Man Play by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“C.S. Lewis and Catholicism” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

“The Ecumenism of John Paul II” by Kenneth Whitehead, United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Postsecondary Education (retired)

“The Encyclicals of Pope John Paul II” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Experiences as Gentleman in Waiting to Pope John Paul II” by Joseph Hagan, President Emeritus of Assumption College, Professor-At-Large at John Cabot University, and Gentleman-in-Waiting to Pope John Paul II

“G.K. Chesterton and C.S. Lewis: Keys to Their Apologetic Success” ” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

“Healing and the Communion of Saints” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Ignatius of Loyola and his Response to the Spiritual Crisis in the Sixteenth Century” by Fr. Michael Maher, S.J., Assistant Professor of History at St. Louis University

“Jacque Maritain on the Church of Christ” by Jude P. Dougherty, Dean Emeritus of the School of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America

“John Henry Newman” By Fr. C. John McCloskey, Director of the Catholic Information Center, Washington, D.C.

Lectures on Chesterton by John C. “Chuck” Chalberg

“The Life of St. Francis of Assisi” a One-Man Play by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“The Life of St. John of the Cross” a One-Man Play by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“The Life of St. Maximilian Kolbe” a One-Man Play by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“Literature and the Sacramental Imagination” (J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Sigrid Undset, Gerard Manley Hopkins) by Abromaitis, C.N.: Loyola College in Maryland, Professor of English

“The Men of Vatican II” by Fr. Joseph Fessio, S.J., Editor at Ignatius Press and Chancellor of Ave Maria University

“Natural Law, John Courtney Murray, and the Emergence of an Abortion Culture” by Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Newman and Catholic Higher Education” by Don Briel, Koch Chair in Catholic Studies at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas, MN.

“Newman and Science” by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“Our Everlasting Orthodoxy,” a One-Man Play by John C. “Chuck” Chalberg

“Pope John Paul II: The Man and His Mission” by Joseph Hagan, President Emeritus of Assumption College, Professor-At-Large at John Cabot University, and Gentleman-in-Waiting to Pope John Paul II

“The Philosophical background to Pope John Paul II’s Personalist Anthropology & Moral Thought” by Jorge Garcia, Professor of Philosophy at Boston College

“St. Augustine” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“St. Josemaria Escriva” By Fr. C. John McCloskey, Director of the Catholic Information Center, Washington, D.C.

“St. Thomas Aquinas: The Man Behind the Caricature” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“Theology, Spirituality, and Biblical Exegesis of the Fathers of the Church” by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

“The Two Percies” by Peter Augustine Lawler, Dana Professor of Government at Berry College

Mary

“Behold Your Mother: An Evangelical Discovers the Blessed Mother” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Mary: Ark of the Covenant” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

Topics in Mariology, Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz O.P., Dominican Sisters of Mary Mother of the Eucharist

Scripture

“Approaches to Understanding Scripture” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“Deconstructing the Jesus Seminar” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“The Eucharist and the Four Senses of Scripture” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“The Gospel of John” a One-Man Play by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“The Gospel of Luke” a One-Man Play by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“How to Read the Bible: The Four Senses of Scripture” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“In Defense of Allegory” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“The Inevitability of Allegory” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“Making Sense of Scripture: Reading the Bible as the First Christians Did” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“The Many-Sided Gospel” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Natural Law and the Bible” by J. Budziszewski, Associate Professor of Government and Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin

“Psalms and the Life of Prayer” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“Praying with the Scripture” by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

“The Overall Story of the Bible” by Michael Dauphinais, Professor of Theology and Academic Dean at Ave Maria University

“Spiritual Interpretation of the Bible” by Robert Louis Wilken, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia

“The Song of Songs” a One-Man Play by Leonardo Defilippis, founder of St. Luke Productions

“Theology, Spirituality, and Biblical Exegesis of the Fathers of the Church” by John Cavadini, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame

“This is My Body: An Evangelical Discovers the Real Presence” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“Understanding the Book of Revelation” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

Topics in Scripture: by Curtis Martin, President of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students

Vocations/The Religious Life

“Religious Life in the Church Today” by Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz O.P., Dominican Sisters of Mary Mother of the Eucharist

“Vocations — in Particular to the Priesthood and/or Religious Life” by Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz O.P., Dominican Sisters of Mary Mother of the Eucharist

Virtue/Ethics

“Aquinas‚ Moral Theory: Law, Grace, and Virtue” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Can We Be Good Without God?” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Catholic Moral Thought” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Courageous Virtue” by Michael Dauphinais, Professor of Theology and Academic Dean

at Ave Maria University

“Death or Love” (how virtue will save us from ideology) by Bradley Birzer Assistant Professor of History at Hillsdale College and Senior Fellow at the Center for the American Idea in Houston

“Distinguishing Intention from Foresight: What is Included in a Means to and End” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Does Everyone Establish His or Her Own Moral Truth?” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“Double Effect Reasoning” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Exceptionless Norms in Aristotle” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Is Anything that Two People Consented to Do Together All Right Because They Consented?” by William Marshner, Professor of Theology at Christendom College

“Lying: Absolutism and Consequentialism” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Medical Ethics, Reproductive Technology, and the Natural Law” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Moral Self-Deception (How We Pretend to Ourselves that We Don’t Know What We Really Do” by J. Budziszewski, Associate Professor of Government and Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin

“Natural Law Ethics” by Phillip Goggans, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Seattle Pacific University

“The New Morality” by Glenn Olsen, Professor of History at the University of Utah

“The Philosophical background to Pope John Paul II’s Personalist Anthropology & Moral

Thought” by Jorge Garcia, Professor of Philosophy at Boston College

“The ‘Principle’ of Double-Effect” by Jorge Garcia, Professor of Philosophy at Boston College

“Problems in Utilitarian Moral Theory” by Jorge Garcia, Professor of Philosophy at Boston College

“Proportionalism” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Proportionalism and Relativism” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Teleology and Deontology” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

Topics in Ethics by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“The Virtues in Moral Theory” by Jorge Garcia, Professor of Philosophy at Boston College

“Why Values Language is Ambiguous and Not Equivalent to Virtues Language” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

Topics in Virtue/Ethics by Curtis Martin, President of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students

Read More

ASCC Speakers List: Life Issues/Science

Abortion

“Abortion” by Fr. Robert Araujo S.J., Gonzaga University School of Law, Professor of Law

“Abortion and the Culture of Life” by Charles E. Rice, Professor Emeritus of Law at the University of Notre Dame School of Law and Visiting Professor at the Ave Maria University School of Law

“Abortion and the Right to Life” by L. Brent Bozell, Founder and President of the Media Research Center and the Parents Television Council

“The Connection Between Contraception and Abortion” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The Connection Between Contraception, Abortion, and Euthanasia” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The Feminist Case Against Abortion” by Serrin Foster, president of Feminists for Life

“Law and History of Abortion” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Natural Law, John Courtney Murray, and the Emergence of an Abortion Culture” by Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“What is Wrong with Pro-Choice Arguments for Abortion and Euthanasia” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

Topics on Abortion: by Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

Capital Punishment

“Capital Punishment and Euthanasia” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The Death Penalty” by Richard Garnett, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Notre Dame School of Law

“The Morality of the Death Penalty” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Papal Teaching on the Death Penalty” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“Why the Death Penalty? Capital Punishment in the Catholic Tradition” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

Chastity/Modesty

“Chastity” by Camille Di Blasi, President of the Center for Life Principles

“Raising Chaste Children” by Richard Wetzel, M.D., author of Sexual Wisdom: A Guide for Parents, Young Adults, Educators, and Physicians

“Standing with Courage” by Mary-Louise Kurey, Motivational Speaker, Author, Professional Singer, and Miss America Finalist

“Modesty” by Camille Di Blasi, President of the Center for Life Principles

Cloning/Stem Cell Research

“A Consumer’s Guide to the Brave New World” by Wesley J. Smith, Senior Fellow at the Discovery Institute

“Cloning and Stem Cell Research” by Kenneth Whitehead, United States Assistant Secretary of Education for Postsecondary Education (retired)

“Human Cloning” by Fr. Robert Araujo S.J., Gonzaga University School of Law, Professor of Law

“Fetal Research” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

Contraception/Natural Family Planning

“The Case Against Contraception” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“The Catholic Catechism and Contraception” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“The Church’s Teaching on Contraception: A Woman’s Friend or Foe?” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary

“The Connection Between Contraception and Abortion” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“The Connection Between Contraception, Abortion, and Euthanasia” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary

“Contraception: A Couple’s Friend or Foe?” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“Contraception: Gateway to the Culture of Death” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Contraception: Why Not” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“The Differences Between Contraception and Natural Family Planning” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary

“Humanae Vitae” by John Mallon, Contributing Editor of Inside the VaticanMagazine

“Humanae Vitae and Conscience” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“Humanae Vitae: Sense or Nonsense?” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“The Moral Differences Between Natural Family Planning and Artificial Contraception” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“Natural Family Planning, Humanae Vitae, and Evangelium Vitae” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“Natural Law Arguments Against Contraception” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“Pope John Paul II’s Arguments Against Contraception” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“Population Control and the Catholic Church’s Teaching on Contraception” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“Veritatis Splendor and Humanae Vitae” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“Why the Proportionalists Are Wrong About Contraception” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

Natural Family Planning

“The Moral Differences Between Natural Family Planning and Artificial Contraception” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“Natural Family Planning” by Richard Wetzel, M.D., author of Sexual Wisdom: A Guide for Parents, Young Adults, Educators, and Physicians

“Natural Family Planning and Its Positive Effects Within a Marriage As Shown by a Recent Study” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“Natural Family Planning, Humanae Vitae, and Evangelium Vitae” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

Culture of Life/The Family

“Anti-Family Activities at the U.N” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“Bioethics” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Bioethics: Creating a Disposable Caste of People?” by Wesley J. Smith, Senior Fellow at the Discovery Institute

“Catholic Bioethical Principles and Applications to Beginning and End of Life

Issues” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“Communicating the Culture of Life: A Personal Call to Holiness” by Mary Cunningham Agee: The Nurturing Network, President and Founder; Culture of Life Foundation and Institute, Vice Chairman

“A Culture of Life vs. a Culture of Death” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The Culture of Life vs. the Culture of Death” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“The Destructive ‘Sex Education’ Programs in Use at Catholic and Public Schools” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“Evangelium Vitae: An Overview” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“The Fallacy of Brain Death” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“Family as Icon of the Blessed Trinity” by Mark Shea, Senior Content Editor at Catholic Exchange

“The Family Under Siege” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“Four Legs Good, Two Legs Bad — The Anti-Human Values of Animal Rights” by Wesley J. Smith, Senior Fellow at the Discovery Institute

“The Good News About Catholic Sexual Morality” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“Living Out a Pro-Life Spirituality within the Family” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“Medical Ethics, Reproductive Technology, and the Natural Law” by Steven Long, Professor of Philosophy at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Minneapolis

“The Modern vs. the Christian View of the Human Person” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The Myth of Overpopulation” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The New Sexual Revolution Takes Charge! (The Changing Landscape of Sexual Mores in America” by Mary-Louise Kurey, Motivational Speaker, Author, Professional Singer, and Miss America Finalist

“Objective Truth and the Culture of Death” by Richard Wetzel, M.D., author of SexualWisdom: A Guide for Parents, Young Adults, Educators, and Physicians

“The Philosophy of the Pro-Life Movement” by Camille Di Blasi, President of the Center for Life Principles

“Pro-Life 101” by Leon Suprenant, President of Catholics United for the Faith

“Quality of Life and the Culture of Life. An Either/Or?” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“The Reality of Organ Donation and Transplantation” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“Theological Andrology: What it Means to Be a Real Man from God’s Point of View” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“The U.N.’s Threat to Life, Faith, and Family” by Austin Ruse, President of the Catholic Family and Human Rights Institute

“Veritatis Splendor and Bioethics” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Veritatis Splendor and the Catholic Moral Life” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Whence and Whither the Pro-Life Movement?” by Connaught Marshner, President of the American Catholic Council

General Speakers on Pro-Life Issues:

Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Eléonore Raoul Professor of the Humanities and Professor of History

Mary Beth Bonacci, Real Love Productions

Maggie Gallagher, author and syndicated columnist

Margaret Monahan Hogan, Chair of the Philosophy Department at King’s College, President of the Center for Academic Integrity at Duke University, and Fellow at the Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture

Euthanasia

“Capital Punishment and Euthanasia” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The Connection Between Contraception, Abortion, and Euthanasia” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary

Lectures on Euthanasia by Camille Di Blasi, President of the Center for Life Principles

“The Slippery Slope from Assisted Suicide to Legalized Murder” by Wesley J. Smith, Senior Fellow at the Discovery Institute

“What is Wrong with Pro-Choice Arguments for Abortion and Euthanasia” by Iain T. Benson, Executive Director of the Centre for Culture and Renewal, Barrister and Solicitor

Faith and Science

“Chesterton and Science” by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“The Christian Origin of Science” by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“Galileo the Scientist” (3 lectures) by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“Newman and Science” by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“The Implications of Quantum Mechanics” by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“Refuting Triumphalist Enlightenment Notions About Science” by Michael Tkacz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University

“Science and Belief” (8 lectures) by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

“Theology and the New Physics” by Peter Hodgson, President of the Science Secretariat of Pax Romana and retired Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Oxford University

Animal Intelligence

“Philosophers in the Mist” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

“Did Doctor Doolittle Get It Wrong?” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

Evolution/Darwinism/Intelligent Design

“Darwinian Evolution” by Michael Behe, Professor of Biochemistry at Lehigh University

“Intelligent Design of Life” by Michael Behe, Professor of Biochemistry at Lehigh University

“The Catholic Church and Evolution” by Michael Behe, Professor of Biochemistry at Lehigh University

“Darwin’s Black Box” by Michael Behe, Professor of Biochemistry at Lehigh University

“The Problem of Evolution: a Philosopher Assays Naturalism” by Curtis L. Hancock, Joseph M. Freeman Chair of Philosophy at Rockhurst University and President of the Gilson Society for the Advancement of Christian Philosophy

Marriage and Dating

“Choosing a Mate for Life” by Connaught Marshner, President of the American Catholic Council

“The Church’s View of Marriage” by Michael Dauphinais, Professor of Theology and Academic Dean at Ave Maria University

“Marital Acts Without Marital Vows” by Christopher Kaczor, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University

“Marriage: a Person-Affirming, Love-Enabling, Life-Giving, and Sanctifying Reality” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“Marriage and Sexual Ethics” by William E. May, Michael J. McGivney Professor of Moral Theology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family

“The Nature of Marriage” by Margaret Monahan Hogan, Chair of the Philosophy Department at King’s College, President of the Center for Academic Integrity at Duke University, and Fellow at the Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture

“Understanding Catholic Declarations of Nullity” By Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

General Speakers on Marriage/Dating:

Curtis Martin, President of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students

Maggie Gallagher: Author and Syndicated Columnist

Michael A. Scaperlanda, Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law

Human Sexuality/Theology of the Body

“Catholic Moral Teachings on Love and Sexuality” by John Mallon, Contributing Editor of Inside the Vatican Magazine

“The Christian Meaning of Human Sexuality” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

“Dating and Relationships” by Mary Beth Bonacci, Real Love Productions

“Human Sexuality” by Mary Beth Bonacci, Real Love Productions

“The Modern vs. the Christian View of Human Sexuality” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

“Natural Family Planning” by Richard Wetzel, M.D., author of Sexual Wisdom: A Guide for Parents, Young Adults, Educators, and Physicians

“Natural Family Planning, Humanae Vitae, and Evangelium Vitae” by Mercedes Arzu Wilson, President of the Family of the Americas

“Pornography” By Stephen M. Krason, President of the Society of Catholic Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at the Franciscan University of Steubenville

“The Sexual Mess That We Are In and How We Got Here” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

“The Sexual Revolution: Fifty Years Later” by Donald Critchlow, Professor of History at Saint Louis University

“Where the Sexual Revolution Has Gone Wrong” by Richard Wetzel, M.D., author of Sexual Wisdom: A Guide for Parents, Young Adults, Educators, and Physicians

“Why Premarital Sex is Wrong” by Janet Smith, Visiting Professors in Life Issues, Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit

General Speaker on Human Sexuality: Maggie Gallagher, Author and Syndicated Columnist

Theology of the Body

“The Dignity of the Human Person and John Paul II’s Theology of the Body” by Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz O.P., Dominican Sisters of Mary Mother of the Eucharist

“Pope John Paul II’s Theology of the Body” by Fr. Roger Landry, S.J.

“The Theology of the Body of Pope John Paul II” by Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University

Read More

Press Releases

Bishops Back Out of Commencement Ceremonies

May 22, 2003

Following protests by Cardinal Newman Society, three bishops have canceled planned appearances at the commencement ceremonies of the College of the Holy Cross (MA), College Misericordia (PA) and the University of Scranton (PA).

Cardinal Newman Society has protested the selection of MSNBC commentator Chris Matthews to speak at both the University of Scranton and the College of the Holy Cross because of his abortion-rights position.  In his television commentary and newspaper columns, Matthews has publicly
declared “I’m for abortion rights,” even appearing to endorse partial-birth abortion for severely handicapped babies.

Bishop James Timlin of Scranton, Pennsylvania, will not attend the University of Scranton’s commencement ceremony on Sunday, citing a policy of refusing to share a stage with public abortion-rights advocates. Bishop Daniel Reilly of Worcester, Massachusetts, announced yesterday that
he will not attend tomorrow’s Holy Cross ceremony for the same reason.

“Holy Cross will confer an honorary degree on a Catholic person who publicly espouses the view that, in some cases, people have a right to terminate a life in the womb,” Bishop Reilly said.  “I cannot let my
presence imply support for anything less than the protection of all life at all its stages.”

Alumni are protesting the selection of Matthews, led by the Holy Cross Cardinal Newman Society (www.hccns.org) and Charles Millard, who chaired the Holy Cross board of trustees from 1977-1982 and served another 22 years as a trustee.  Rev. Richard John Neuhaus, editor of First Things
magazine and president of the Religion & Public Life Institute, also weighed in last month with a statement critical of the college.

Holy Cross president Rev. Michael McFarland, S.J., has responded to the protests by falsely claiming that Matthews’ views are consistent with Catholic teaching.

Auxiliary Bishop John Dougherty of Scranton, an advisor to Cardinal Newman Society, did not attend College Misericordia’s ceremony on Saturday because of concerns about the commencement speakers, journalists Cokie and Steven Roberts.

Although Cokie has written in the couple’s syndicated column that she “tends to favor pro-life arguments,” her husband, “who is Jewish, is more sympathetic to the pro-choice side” (May 25, 1997).  Steve’s writings portray both pro-life and radical feminist activists as extreme, whereas the “middle” or “moderate” position agrees “that a woman has a right to choose abortion, but the right is not unlimited” (U.S. News & World Report, April 12, 1993).  The Roberts’ joint column also has repeatedly echoed Steve’s call for “moderation” on the abortion issue, endorsing restrictions on abortion but espousing abortion rights.  The Roberts have labeled those who respect the dignity of all human life as extremists,
while labeling individuals like Christine Todd Whitman–who vetoed a ban on partial-birth abortion–as moderates.

The Cardinal Newman Society protest is part of its annual survey of commencement speakers whose public actions and statements are opposed to Catholic teaching.  See www.cardinalnewmansociety.org for a complete list.  The Society has teamed up with the American Life League (www.all.org),
which is also protesting pro-abortion commencement speakers as part of its “Crusade for the Defense of our Catholic Church.”

Catholic Colleges Alter Websites That Sent Students to Planned Parenthood

December 10, 2002

FALLS CHURCH, VA — Catholic universities that promote Planned Parenthood on their websites are feeling the heat of recent publicity and public outrage, with at least two of them quickly removing or hiding the offensive web pages following negative publicity.

Early this week, leaders of the Association of Students at Catholic Colleges (ASCC) and its parent organization, the national Cardinal Newman Society, complained that the websites of at least eight Catholic universities in the United States directed students to Planned Parenthood for information, services, and even employment.  ASCC and the Cardinal Newman Society are dedicated to the renewal of Catholic identity in Catholic higher education.

LifeSite News (www.lifesite.net) and several pro-life organizations reported the scandal, which involves Boston College; DePaul University in Chicago; Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.; John Carroll University in Cleveland; Loyola University of Chicago; Santa Clara University; Seattle University; and the University of San Francisco.  DePaul is a Vincentian university; the other seven are Jesuit institutions.

Where the University of San Francisco once posted a “Pregnancy” page (www.usfca.edu/shep/pregnancy.htm) linked to promotions for Planned Parenthood and the local Women’s Community Clinic, the site now reads, “This portion of the web site is currently being reviewed.”  But although the links have been removed, the pages promoting Planned Parenthood and the Women’s Community Clinic are still online at www.usfca.edu/shep/pregnancy_link2.htm and www.usfca.edu/shep/pregnancy_link1.htm.  USF touts Planned Parenthood as a source for pregnancy testing and counseling, birth control, and emergency contraception (which causes early abortion), but it fails to mention Planned Parenthood’s role as the nation’s leading abortion provider.  The Women’s Community Clinic provides pregnancy testing and counseling and referrals to abortion clinics.

Georgetown University apparently removed a “sex health and safety” page from its website after LifeSite News reported that the page linked to a Planned Parenthood website, promoted the morning after pill (an abortifacient), and encouraged the use of sexual aids including dental dams and latex gloves for “safer sex.”  But the page, formerly at www.georgetown.edu/student-affairs/healthed/sex.htm, is still identified by the website’s search engine.  Georgetown’s website continues to promote the use of condoms and dental dams on its “STDs/HIV” page (www.georgetown.edu/student-affairs/healthed/stdhiv.htm).

“The website changes are heartening, but they are just the beginning,” said Thomas Harmon, ASCC President and a senior at Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington.  “We intend to ensure that all of these web links are removed from the universities’ sites.”

The websites are only the latest signs of Catholic universities’ reluctance to implement Ex corde Ecclesiae, Pope John Paul II’s 1990 apostolic constitution on Catholic higher education.

“In Ex Corde Ecclesiae, one of the requirements of a Catholic university is that all official actions and commitments must be in accord with the university’s Catholic identity,” said Patrick Reilly, President of the Cardinal Newman Society.  “Anything that is announced or promoted by a university’s website is an official action.  By promoting Planned Parenthood or taking any step that might drive students toward Planned Parenthood for an abortion is not only a violation of Ex Corde Ecclesiae, but also a scandal and a terrible crime against young women.”

In a Vatican address last Thursday, Pope John Paul II demanded that Catholic university administrators “be vigilant in maintaining rectitude and Catholic principles in teaching and research in the heart of their university. It is clear that university centers that do not respect the Church’s laws and the teaching of the Magisterium, especially in bioethics, cannot be defined as Catholic universities.”

“Catholic college students are leading the renewal of Catholic higher education,” Harmon said.  “ASCC’s emphasis is on positive campus programs to teach and promote the Catholic faith, but when an outcry is needed, college administrators will hear us loud and clear.”

Other websites protested by ASCC include:

 

  • Boston College provides a toll-free number to Planned Parenthood in its listing of local “Hospitals and Clinics” at www.bc.edu/bc_org/svp/house/offcampus/phone.htm.

 

 

  • DePaul University’s Department of Sociology offers internships at Planned Parenthood (http://condor.depaul.edu/~soc/undergraduate_descriptions.htm), and its Women’s Studies Program lists Planned Parenthood among several career opportunities for its students (http://condor.depaul.edu/~wms/careers.html).
  • The Student Health Center at John Carroll University (www.jcu.edu/studentl/Health%20Services/information.htm) lists Planned Parenthood among its “counseling sites.”
  • The Women’s Studies Program at Loyola University of Chicago (www.luc.edu/depts/women_stu/links.html) provides links to Planned Parenthood as well as pro-abortion organizations including the National Organization for Women and the Feminist Majority Foundation.
  • Santa Clara University refers students to Planned Parenthood (www.scu.edu/SCU/Projects/SourceBook/Medical/menu.htm ), explicitly touting abortion, pregnancy testing, and family planning.  The university’s Student Health Center promotes a website, noting that “one of the best things about this site” is its links to resources like Planned Parenthood.
  • Seattle University’s Wismer Center, an interdisciplinary program to address issues of diversity and justice, includes among its “Activism” resources (www.seattleu.edu/wismer/links.htm) links to Planned Parenthood, the National Organization for Women, and the Feminist Majority Foundation.  The university’s Wellness and Prevention Center page (www.seattleu.edu/student/wellness/Resources2001v2.html) also links to Planned Parenthood and the Seattle Gay Clinic for HIV/AIDS testing and to pro-contraception websites like www.unspeakable.com for information on sexually transmitted diseases.

For more information about ASCC or Cardinal Newman Society, see the organizations’ websites at www.catholiccollegestudents.org and www.cardinalnewmansociety.org or call (703) 367-0333.

Read More